Traditional Ingredients – Sushi Restaurant Albany http://sushirestaurantalbany.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 14:20:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Traditional Ingredients – Sushi Restaurant Albany http://sushirestaurantalbany.com/ 32 32 Favorite family recipes and the stories that make them memorable https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/favorite-family-recipes-and-the-stories-that-make-them-memorable/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/favorite-family-recipes-and-the-stories-that-make-them-memorable/ All Things We’re Cooking is a series featuring cooking gems from you, our readers and listeners, and the special stories behind them. We will continue to share more of your recipes throughout the holidays. When making Thanksgiving dressing, Grandma Monnette had a simple rule Rather than stuffing the turkey, Rebecca Monnette made dressing balls with […]]]>

All Things We’re Cooking is a series featuring cooking gems from you, our readers and listeners, and the special stories behind them. We will continue to share more of your recipes throughout the holidays.

When making Thanksgiving dressing, Grandma Monnette had a simple rule

Rather than stuffing the turkey, Rebecca Monnette made dressing balls with a few simple ingredients that cook safely outside of the bird. His grandson carries on the tradition.

Learn more about Grandma Monnette’s dress-up balls

She loved mom’s picadillo but never got the recipe. TikTok pushed her to get creative

After the death of her mother, thanks to the advice of her aunts, Miriam Piccolo recreated a dish that resembles her. Coming home from school to this meal meant that her mother had thought of her.

Learn more about Miriam Piccolo’s picadillo

Friends and family flip these krumkake cookies

Lisa Hovis learned to make these traditional Norwegian cookies by baking alongside her grandmother. The recipe and the good memories remain.

Read more about Norwegian krumkake cookies from Lisa Hovis

The ‘human cannonball’ is gone, but his lasagna recipe lives on

A circus performer known for being shot from a cannon enjoyed cooking dinner for the people he worked with. One of them still makes his inspired lasagna today, and it contains some surprising ingredients.

Learn more about Edmondo “Papa” Zacchini’s lasagna

It took clever thinking to write a recipe for this family favorite Irish soda bread

Maureen O’Reilly wanted to make the treat for her husband, but first she had to watch her grandmother make it – and measure each ingredient rather than just watch it.

Learn more about Irish soda bread from Maureen O’Reilly

Husband’s love for crispy prosciutto turned a casserole of green beans

Parmesan cheese and panko breadcrumbs complete this dish. Don’t expect cream of mushroom soup or fried onions in this twist on a traditional recipe.

Learn more about Becky Ellis’ Green Bean Stew

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

All Things We’re Cooking is a series highlighting family recipes that hold special meaning to you, our readers and listeners. Earlier this year, we asked you to share your favorite recipes and explain why these dishes evoke such fond family memories. Working with NPR member stations, we received responses from across the country. We’ve interviewed some backers and will continue to share their stories throughout the holiday season. All recipes and photos were provided by NPR audience members.

CREDITS
Reporting by Wynne Davis, with Isabella Gomez Sarmiento and Maison Tran
Editing by Desiree F. Hicks and Pam Webster
Design and art direction by Daniel Wood, Emily Bogle, Kaz Fantone and Alyson Hurt
Development by Daniel Wood
Project management by Caroline Kelly
Social Media Engagement by Matt Adams
Audio versions of the stories produced by Rose Friedman and Isabella Gomez Sarmiento, with assistance from Maison Tran
Additional editing by Gerry Holmes, Nicholas Charles and Neda Ulaby
NPR Member Station Collaboration by Franklyn Cater

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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South Delhi’s new Parisian cafe serves up classics with a French twist. https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/south-delhis-new-parisian-cafe-serves-up-classics-with-a-french-twist/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 05:54:04 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/south-delhis-new-parisian-cafe-serves-up-classics-with-a-french-twist/ Chef-preneur Vanshika Bhatia has always been one step ahead of the culinary curve. She has a fantastic understanding of French gastronomy and patisserie, thanks to her experience in some of the most renowned haute cuisine hotspots in the world. At her new bistro in Defense Colony, she takes her comfort food to a new level. […]]]>

Chef-preneur Vanshika Bhatia has always been one step ahead of the culinary curve. She has a fantastic understanding of French gastronomy and patisserie, thanks to her experience in some of the most renowned haute cuisine hotspots in the world. At her new bistro in Defense Colony, she takes her comfort food to a new level. Bhatia has meticulously curated The Petite Pie Shop’s menu, combining fresh, locally grown produce with French cooking techniques. She tells us about her journey as a chef, the inspiration behind her menu, and more.

What is the signature dish on your menu?

Sometimes classics are classics for a reason. The signature chicken pot pie is widely known, and for good reason. Chicken cooked with a delicious garlicky tomato base and topped with a sheet of puff pastry makes dipping your spoon into this dish a joyful experience.

Three dishes that you recommend on your menu?

We explored many different ingredients that are available locally and seasonally. The wild mushroom pie is served with a mixture of three to four different kinds of locally grown (wild) mushrooms and cooked in a cream sauce. The berry crumble pie and the salted caramel pie are highly recommended on the sweet side.

What was your culinary inspiration?

Cooking is my passion, and during the covid-19 pandemic I realized that people are looking for comfort more than good food. I’ve been baking for years, and because of my love for bread and pies, I decided to share that love with my customers even before becoming a chef.

Considering your menu is mostly French and English, do you think it matches the stereotypical taste buds of India??

The idea behind a predominantly French and English menu is to allow customers to explore and try something new. We stay true to flavor and invite guests to try their luck with something unexpected.

And with the rise of the tourism industry, many of our customers are already familiar with the dishes and ingredients from their travels.

Have travels been a source of inspiration for your cooking?

Absolutely. Much of the exposure to new recipes, new dishes, new ingredients, and new styles of cooking comes from travel. Meeting locals, listening to their stories, eating the food they put on their table, all of this is a source of ideas and creativity. Travel is essential and I highly recommend it.

This apple pie recipe from chef Vanshika Bhatia will satisfy your craving for something sweet during the cold season.

Traditional apple pie

Ingredients:

Red apple -1

Green apple -1

Sugar – 2 tablespoons

Cinnamon powder – 1 pinch

Nutmeg – 1 pinch

Butter – 1 tbsp

Pie base

Pastry

Method:

Preheat the oven to 170 degrees Celsius.

Peel and cut the apples into medium-sized cubes. Mix with sugar, cinnamon powder and nutmeg.

Add the butter at room temperature and mix.

Pour the mixture into a pre-baked pie crust and spread it evenly.

Roll out the puff pastry on a flat surface. Cut out the size needed to cover the pie. Make the design according to your requirements. Place the pie shell on top and pinch the edges to seal.

Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until the top is golden brown.

Serve hot with custard.

Details:

Little pie shop

Shop Number 39, Defense Colony.New Delhi.

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Stage-stealing roasted beet salad – Garden & Gun https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/stage-stealing-roasted-beet-salad-garden-gun/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 18:01:58 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/stage-stealing-roasted-beet-salad-garden-gun/ For 157 years of its 166 year history, Tujagueis proudly served a five-course, host table menu which varied only in the choice of a few Creole starters. But even before the introduction of a more diverse a la carte menu in 2013, Thanksgiving was a bit different, with turkey and dressing supplanting the tastes of […]]]>

For 157 years of its 166 year history, Tujagueis proudly served a five-course, host table menu which varied only in the choice of a few Creole starters. But even before the introduction of a more diverse a la carte menu in 2013, Thanksgiving was a bit different, with turkey and dressing supplanting the tastes of almandine trout and chicken clemenceau. Today, the French Quarter institution, considered the third-oldest restaurant in America, still creates a special Thanksgiving lunch that highlights the traditional roast turkey, but chef Gus Martin has also made stars of the early days. dishes to arrive at the table. A standout is its roasted beet salad, amped up with goat cheese, spiced pecans and (mmmm) bacon vinaigrette.

“I love cooking for Thanksgiving because it’s about bringing people together and catching up,” Martin says. “The beet salad is a nice and light way to start the meal before moving on to the heat of the other dishes.”

It’s also a great example of Martin’s focus on seasonal ingredients. “I think beets are so good this time of year, and the best way to eat a beet is roasting it,” he says. “Their sweetness is really complemented by the bacon and goat cheese.”

Harried Thanksgiving cooks take note: While the recipe requires several components to be prepared separately, none are particularly difficult and most can be made ahead. Of course, you don’t need to divulge this to your impressed guests.

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Meatless meals to replace traditional Thanksgiving turkey – Iowa State Daily https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/meatless-meals-to-replace-traditional-thanksgiving-turkey-iowa-state-daily/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 03:17:34 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/meatless-meals-to-replace-traditional-thanksgiving-turkey-iowa-state-daily/ Nicole Hasek The Bean Pot, from “Step-by-Step Vegetarian”, by Rosemary Wadey. Imagine the stereotypical Thanksgiving: turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing and pumpkin pie. Turkey seems like the epitome of a holiday to many people, but it doesn’t have to be the main course. The Daily tried these meatless recipes to cook a meal everyone can enjoy. […]]]>

Nicole Hasek

The Bean Pot, from “Step-by-Step Vegetarian”, by Rosemary Wadey.

Imagine the stereotypical Thanksgiving: turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing and pumpkin pie. Turkey seems like the epitome of a holiday to many people, but it doesn’t have to be the main course. The Daily tried these meatless recipes to cook a meal everyone can enjoy.

Taking traditional meals and making them meatless is a lot easier than you might think. Whether for dietary needs, moral reasons or otherwise, vegetarianism is becoming increasingly popular. According Pulse College, 14% of university students are vegetarians or vegans. Don’t leave your vegetarian friends out this Thanksgiving.

Potato salad with sour cream

Preparation time: 30 minutes
There’s nothing more classic at Thanksgiving than potatoes. From a delicious sour cream dressing to warm and hearty potatoes, this dish will satisfy everyone at the table. After serving this dish to my friends, they all agreed it was a hit.

Ingredients:

  • 3 potatoes
  • ⅔ cup sour cream
  • 3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 4 green onions, trimmed and chopped
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley
  • A pinch of salt and pepper

To prepare, add about seven cups of lightly salted water to a saucepan and bring to a boil. Cut the potatoes into rounds about ½ inch thick, then add them to the boiling water. Cook uncovered for 10 minutes or until tender.

To create the dressing, combine all the ingredients (sour cream, mayonnaise, green onions, parsley and salt/pepper) in a bowl, then pour over the potatoes. Mix well and serve.

Pot of roasted beans

Preparation time: 90 minutes
With tofu protein and delicious BBQ flavor, the BBQ Bean Pot is a casserole full of flavor.

Ingredients:

  • ¼ cup butter
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 2 crushed garlic cloves
  • 2 carrots, cut into small pieces
  • 2 celery stalks, cut into small pieces
  • 1 tablespoon paprika
  • 2 teaspoons of cumin
  • 15 oz chopped tomatoes
  • 15 oz mixed beans, drained and rinsed
  • ⅔ cup vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon of molasses
  • 12 oz block of tofu, pressed and cut into bite-size pieces
  • Salt and pepper to taste

To prepare this dish, start by melting the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for five minutes. Then add the carrots and celery and cook for another two minutes. Stir occasionally. Add tomatoes, spices, beans, molasses and vegetable broth. Stir and cook uncovered for 30 minutes. Then add the tofu pieces and cook covered for another 20 minutes. Remove from heat and serve.

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Rahul cooks “bongu chicken” with adivasi women https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/rahul-cooks-bongu-chicken-with-adivasi-women/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 20:49:00 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/rahul-cooks-bongu-chicken-with-adivasi-women/ JOGIPET (SANGAREDDY): Congressman Rahul Gandhi prepared the popular ‘Bamboo Chicken’ with Adivasi women who came from Bhadrachalam to participate in Bharat Jodo Yatra in Andhole constituency. Bamboo chicken, popularly known as “bongu chicken”, mixes pieces of country chicken and broiler chicken in a piece of bamboo. Taking the Adivasi women by surprise, Rahul mixed chili, […]]]>

JOGIPET (SANGAREDDY): Congressman Rahul Gandhi prepared the popular ‘Bamboo Chicken’ with Adivasi women who came from Bhadrachalam to participate in Bharat Jodo Yatra in Andhole constituency. Bamboo chicken, popularly known as “bongu chicken”, mixes pieces of country chicken and broiler chicken in a piece of bamboo.

Taking the Adivasi women by surprise, Rahul mixed chili, salt, turmeric and other ingredients into the chicken pieces and stuffed them into two bamboo sticks and roasted them over a hot coal.

The event took place at Danampalli in Jogipet mandal, according to MP for Mulugu, Dr Seethakka. Later, the women served food in “moduga” leaves to the Congress leader.

No one was allowed in when he was making bamboo chicken. The last time he tried his hand at cooking, last January in Tamil Nadu, the video of the event went viral.

Kondru Sudharani, Sheelam Durga, Korasa Lalitha, Payam Bhadhramma, Ganne Boyina Srinu of Bhadrachalam prepared the special dishes including bamboo chicken, ragi java, pasha koora and boddu koora pappu.

Sudharani said it was a rare opportunity for them to cook special dishes with Rahul, who really enjoyed the preparation. She said Rahul found the traditional dishes of thota koora and adivasis “tasty”.

Another Adivasi woman, Payam Bhadramma, said Rahul Gandhi asked them to come to his house in Delhi and cook the same and other new dishes.

Alongside TPCC Chairman A. Revanth Reddy, Rahul Gandhi also tried his hand at pot making in Andhole.

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14 Restaurants Open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix – Perfect for Celebrating! https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/14-restaurants-open-on-thanksgiving-day-in-phoenix-perfect-for-celebrating/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 22:19:57 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/14-restaurants-open-on-thanksgiving-day-in-phoenix-perfect-for-celebrating/ Looking for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix? If so, keep reading! If you’re looking for the best restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix, you’ve come to the right place! In our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix, we’ve compiled a list of restaurants for every budget, located throughout the city. We’ve also […]]]>

Looking for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix? If so, keep reading!

If you’re looking for the best restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix, you’ve come to the right place!

In our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix, we’ve compiled a list of restaurants for every budget, located throughout the city.

We’ve also tried to include many different cuisines in our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix – so you can find something perfect for your group!

So, let’s go and explore some of the best restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix!


Our favorite restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix!


Ocean 44

Image credit: https://www.ocean44.com/

First on our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix is ​​the Incredible Ocean 44.

If you like seafood or steak, we know you’ll love eating here. Because these are the foods they specialize in and are perfect at.

The setting is intimate yet vibrant, and the energy is truly lovely. The restaurant is elegant, but also a bit traditional.

It’s a great mix and a great choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.

You’ll find incredible USDA prime steaks on their menu, as well as delicious seafood and shellfish. Yum!

This is a great choice when choosing restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix.


The Mission – Old Town Scottsdale

Image credit: https://www.instagram.com/themissionaz/

Our second suggestion for restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix is The Mission in Old Town Scottsdale.

It’s a beautiful restaurant, and even if you don’t visit it on Thanksgiving, we recommend you visit it on any other occasion!

It’s the perfect choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix, especially if you want something a little untraditional.

You’ll find celebrity chef Matt Carter (Zinc Bistro and Fat Ox) leading the team here. It brings a modern twist to the Latin cuisine the restaurant serves.

The food mixes influences from Spain, Mexico, Central America and South America. So if you like these cuisines, we guarantee you will love the food here. It’s one of a kind!

Definitely a must visit for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.


beef fat

Image credit: http://www.ilovefatox.com/

Next on our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix is ​​the Incredible beef fat.

Fat Ox is run by Chef Matt Carter, and it’s a restaurant that’s alive with flavor and style. This place is top notch and you can expect amazing dishes that will blow your mind.

It’s a wonderful choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix, and the menu is truly unique and delicious.

The cuisine here is regional Italian fare, but the team at Fat Ox have put their own twist on the dishes – giving them new life and bringing real excitement to the menu.

This place is a fantastic choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.

Learn more about Arizona: Is it snowing in Arizona?


Restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix: Mastro’s City Hall Steakhouse

Image credit: Mastro Town Hall Steakhouse

Mastro Town Hall Steakhouse is our next suggestion for great restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix. It’s a great choice, especially if you like (you guessed it!) steak.

As you’d expect, this place prioritizes beautiful ingredients and high-quality meats and produce – so you know you’re in for a delicious meal if you dine here.

Shall we dine here? We would choose the Porterhouse steak and then add delicious side dishes to go with it. Like lobster mashed potatoes and cream of corn.

Are you still hungry?

This is a great choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.


Hearth ’61 in Mountain Shadows

Image credit: https://www.instagram.com/hearth61/

Next on our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix is Hearth ’61 in Mountain Shadows.

What can you expect from Hearth ’61 in Mountain Shadows? Well, you’ll find beautiful seasonal dishes cooked in their incredible signature oven, from the inventive mind of chef Alfred Muro.

What can you expect for Thanksgiving?

They’ll be hosting an incredible three-course dinner featuring squash soup, braised prime rib and a slow-roasted “Two Wash Ranch” turkey dinner — with all the trimmings of course. Would you expect less?

It will set you back $125 which is quite amazing for the amount of food and quality of food on offer.

It’s a great choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix, especially if you fancy dining somewhere with a great view.


RA Sushi Bar Restaurant

Image credit: https://www.instagram.com/rasushi/

Our next suggestion for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix is RA Sushi Bar Restaurant.

If you’re looking for something a little lighter than traditional Thanksgiving food, RA Sushi Bar restaurant would be a great option for you.

This place serves up some of the best sushi in town, and it’s very popular with tourists and locals alike. This is a great choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.


Restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix: Steak 44

Image credit: https://www.steak44.com/

Next on our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix is Steak 44. Yes, we know another steak!

But trust us, every steak on this list deserves to be there!

Steak 44 is one of Phoenix’s most popular steakhouses, and it’s not hard to see why.

They serve the best high quality steaks and seafood, and the energy is delicious. This is a great choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.


Feringhee Modern Indian Cuisine

Image credit: https://www.feringhee.com/

If you’re looking for a slightly different cuisine this Thanksgiving, we think you’ll love our next suggestion for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.

Feringhee Modern Indian Cuisineserve the most delicious Indian cuisine, with vibrant, bright and complex flavors.

Sometimes you’re not in the mood for traditional Thanksgiving food, and if that’s you, you’ll love it here. It’s no wonder this place made it to our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.

This place is located a little out of central Phoenix in Chandler, but well worth the extra drive. We think you’ll love it.

This is a great choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.


Cartwright’s Sonoran Ranch House

Next on our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix is Cartwright’s Sonoran Ranch House.

As with most of the restaurants on this list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix, you’ll definitely want to book ahead here.

Cartwright’s in Cave Creek offers a delicious three-course meal on Thanksgiving Day, for just $65 per person.

They’re also great for inclusivity here, as they also offer gluten-free, vegetarian, and vegan meals!


Renata’s home

Image credit: Renata’s home

Renata’s home is next on our list of the best restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.

Renata’s Hearth is a gorgeous foodie destination, full of magic, mezcal and memories (as they say!).

Renata’s Hearth is more than just a restaurant, it’s a great experience and evening. With the addition of amazing cooked foods!

You can see why we added this place to our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.

The food here, in case you didn’t know, is Latin American cuisine, with a modern twist and elegant flavors.

This is a great choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.


Bourbon & Bone

Image credit: https://www.bourbonandbones.com/

Next on our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix and Scottsdale is Bourbon & Os.

Bourbon & Bones is a chophouse and bar, and it would be a nice place to hang out and relax with some great Thanksgiving food.

As you would expect from a specialty steakhouse, these guys serve amazing cuts of meat. All of incredible quality.

We think you’ll love it. This is a great choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix.


STK-Scottsdale

Image credit: https://stksteakhouse.com/

Next on our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix is STK in Scottsdale.

STK is a pretty solid choice for Thanksgiving. They will likely have Thanksgiving specials, as well as their normal steak menu (but we always recommend checking it out of course).

The menu here is extensive and the food is high quality.

STK is one of those fail-safe options, which most members of a party will really appreciate (maybe not vegans though!).

It’s a great choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix and Scottsdale.

Learn more about Arizona: 28 fun things to do in Scotssdale for every budget


Cooking + Cocktails

Image credit: https://www.instagram.com/cobrekitchen/

Next on our list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix is Cooking + Cocktails.

Cobre Kitchen prioritizes healthy meals, with local ingredients – two things we absolutely love.

And don’t forget the cocktails either – a key part of any Thanksgiving meal!

This is a great choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix!

Learn more about Arizona: 19 Fun Things to Do in Sedona with Kids


Blue Hound Food and Cocktails

Image credit: https://bluehoundkitchen.com/photos

Our final pick for restaurants open on Thanksgiving in Phoenix is Blue Hound food and cocktails.

If you’re looking for somewhere elegant and casual, we think Blue Hound Kitchen & Cocktails is a great option.

These guys blend seasonal ingredients and modern cuisine – to create impressive and unique dishes. These are familiar flavors with a twist!

This is a great choice for restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix!


We hope this list of restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix has given you plenty of ideas!

Which of these restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix do you plan to dine at?

With so many choices of restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day in Phoenix, it’s a tough call!

Learn more about Thanksgiving: 18 Restaurants Open on Thanksgiving Day in Las Vegas

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This is how Pound Cake got its name https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/this-is-how-pound-cake-got-its-name/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 21:02:00 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/this-is-how-pound-cake-got-its-name/ Before trying a traditional pound cake recipe, you might be intrigued to know where the name comes from. According POPSUGAR.Pound cake originated in Europe in the 1700s and surprisingly contained a pound of butter, flour, sugar and eggs. While a four-pound cake isn’t the norm these days thanks to recipes’ reduced size, baking powder, and […]]]>

Before trying a traditional pound cake recipe, you might be intrigued to know where the name comes from. According POPSUGAR.Pound cake originated in Europe in the 1700s and surprisingly contained a pound of butter, flour, sugar and eggs.

While a four-pound cake isn’t the norm these days thanks to recipes’ reduced size, baking powder, and measuring cups, the recipe was popular enough to catch on in America by 1796 thanks to Amelia Simmon in her cookbook called “The First American Cookbook”. .” Smithsonian Magazine considers the 47-page cookbook to be one of the first ways Americans inadvertently set themselves apart from Britain. Through many ingredient suggestions and an underlying culture of American family life, Simmons was able to show indirectly how America slowly became a distinct nation.

In Project Gutenburg Ebook from “American Cookery”, among the many cake recipes provided by Simmons, the first recorded American pound cake recipe contains not only rose water, as opposed to vanilla extract, but “spices to your taste” and very few instructions regarding cooking time other than 15 minutes in a “slow oven”. In the “Oxford Companion to Food”, author Alan Davidson also notes pound cake recipes from other countries that emerged in the 19th century: the German sable pie and the French pound cake (per Food Timeline). The popularity of pound cake in America continued over the years and reached another milestone in the mid-1800s with the inclusion of a special ingredient.

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“It’s my front line and I think I won”: the chef puts Ukrainian cuisine back on the map | Ukraine https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/its-my-front-line-and-i-think-i-won-the-chef-puts-ukrainian-cuisine-back-on-the-map-ukraine/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/its-my-front-line-and-i-think-i-won-the-chef-puts-ukrainian-cuisine-back-on-the-map-ukraine/ In a war there are many different fronts and many different forms of resistance. Yevgen Klopotenko, a Ukrainian chef, is waging war on soup. In defiance of the Russian cruise missile and drone attacks that have recently hit Kyiv, Klopotenko, 35, was presiding over his bustling downtown restaurant last week. On the menu, dishes such […]]]>

In a war there are many different fronts and many different forms of resistance. Yevgen Klopotenko, a Ukrainian chef, is waging war on soup.

In defiance of the Russian cruise missile and drone attacks that have recently hit Kyiv, Klopotenko, 35, was presiding over his bustling downtown restaurant last week. On the menu, dishes such as a salad of beets and herring with smoked pear from the Odessa region, game from the Carpathians and a dessert called “Kherson is Ukraine”.

Alongside a citrus semifreddo, the pudding included watermelon he had bought last season in Kherson and fermented. The region, which Vladimir Putin claimed to have annexed last month but which is now the site of fierce fightingis famous for the fruit.

And, of course, Klopotenko served borscht. In this case, with a touch of plum jam to balance the acidity of the beets. For a hint of smoke, it had been cooked slowly and over low heat in a wood-fired oven, like “under a quilt”.

He insists it is a Ukrainian rather than a Russian dish. Like many aspects of Ukrainian culture, it was absorbed and appropriated by the Soviet Union during the 20th century, he argued.

Not everyone agrees. In 2019, a Russian government account tweeted that beetroot soup was “one of Russia’s most famous and beloved dishes”, while the Russian Embassy in Washington said Borscht was a national dish of many countries, including Russia, Poland, Lithuania, Moldova, and Romania.

In retaliation, Klopotenko led an action to persuade Unesco to include Ukrainian borscht on its list of intangible world heritage properties.

Borscht is prepared in the kitchen of Yevgen Klopotenko’s restaurant. Photograph: Ed Ram/The Guardian

Despite a Russian Foreign Ministry spokesperson denounce Ukraine’s failure to “share” borscht as “xenophobia, extremism and Nazism” in April this year, Klopotenko’s attempt was successful. Ukrainian borscht was quickly inscribed on the Unesco list in July. (“Cooking borscht is also practiced in communities in the wider region,” the official listing diplomatically states.) “It’s my front line and I think I won,” Klopotenko said.

In truth, it was just a battle. His longer-term war is to rediscover and revive traditional Ukrainian recipes and ingredients, thus contributing, he hopes, to a renewed sense of identity among the Ukrainian people. “If we eat Ukrainian food, we will become Ukrainians,” he said.

About eight years ago, he realized that the only traditional Ukrainian dishes that most people could name were borscht and varenyky – dumplings stuffed with potatoes, meat or sometimes cherries. What was actually eaten was “Russian, Russian or Russian food – or actually, food from the Soviet Union”, he said. “Mashed potatoes, cutlets, pickled vegetables.”

The keynote of Soviet food was sweetness, he said. Until recently, for example, Ukraine’s Soviet-era guidelines still explicitly excluded spices and herbs, with the sole exception of pepper, from school dinners. But in 2018, in a Jamie-Oliver-style reform effort, Klopotenko introduced dishes such as shepherd’s pie, curry and macaroni cheese on school menus.

Not Ukrainian dishes, of course, but nutritious meals that were also, on their small scale, a geopolitical statement. “When you are open to the world, you are part of the world,” he said. “If you’re not afraid of oregano, you won’t be afraid of Greece and Italy.”

To rehabilitate Ukrainian cuisine, Klopotenko became a detective, delving into Ukraine’s pre-Soviet past. (The name of his restaurant, 100 Rokiv Tomu Vpered, which translates to 100 years back to the future, refers to this dive into culinary history.)

A book called 100 years ahead in Klopotenko's restaurant
A book called 100 years ahead in Klopotenko’s restaurant. Photograph: Ed Ram/The Guardian

He started with books. As we talked, surrounded by diners who savored galushki – meatballs and cherries from the Poltava region – he dumped a trio of volumes on the table.

The first was a poem by the founder of modern Ukrainian literature, Ivan Kotliarevsky. His Aeneida, published in sections from 1798, is a pleasant re-reading of Virgil’s epic poem, the Aeneid – with Cossacks instead of Trojans. “Characters fight a lot, drink and eat,” Klopotenko said. About 150 dishes are mentioned by name, “of which only two or three are currently consumed”.

Yet it gave him the conviction that at one time Ukrainian cuisine was rich and varied. The second work was Practical Kitchen, the first Ukrainian cookbook, published in 1929. The author was Olha Franko, daughter-in-law of the prolific writer and translator Ivan Franko, a leading figure in Ukrainian literary history. She offered recipes for a handful of dishes mentioned by Kotliarevsky.

The third was a volume published in 1913 titled Food and Beverage from Ukraine. It is attributed to a figure called Zinaida Klynovetska, now seen as a pseudonym for writers assembling Ukrainian recipes under threat of persecution for nationalism under the Russian Empire.

Klopotenko then went on research trips across the country, learning about regional food traditions that still exist in the regions from the Carpathian Mountains to Odessa, as well as Crimean Tatar food which, he insisted, made part of Ukraine despite its annexation by Russia in 2014.

These are very refined versions of some of these recipes, using ingredients from the rich farmlands of Ukraine, which he serves in his restaurant.

Food is ready to be served from the kitchen of Klopotenko's restaurant
Food is ready to be served from the kitchen of Klopotenko’s restaurant. Photograph: Ed Ram/The Guardian

Since the invasion, he has also run a canteen for refugees and volunteers in Lviv, western Ukraine, and posts dozens of recipe videos online, giving people “an opportunity not to think to war” while learning to cook Ukrainian.

“I understood that I had to fight on this front line – this cultural front line,” he said.

And then there is the unifying power of soup. Each Ukrainian family has their own slightly different recipe, he said. “But it’s still borscht. Just like us Ukrainians, we are all so free and so different. »

He added: “The one thing this country unites around is borscht. you may like [President Volodymyr] Zelenskiy or not, but nobody in Ukraine would say “I don’t like borscht”.

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THE CLEAN FOOD BRAND UNVEILS ONLY FUSILLI PASTA WITH ORGANIC GREEN BANANA https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/the-clean-food-brand-unveils-only-fusilli-pasta-with-organic-green-banana/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 21:55:08 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/the-clean-food-brand-unveils-only-fusilli-pasta-with-organic-green-banana/ Exclusive Whole Foods Market Launch Nationwide Starting This Month The only pasta that comes straight from a tree! Uniquely, the healthy, organic food brand leading a revolution for the future of food brings a one-of-a-kind healthy pasta alternative to the market – Organic Green Banana Fusilli Pasta. Made from just one ingredient and nothing else, […]]]>

Exclusive Whole Foods Market Launch Nationwide Starting This Month

The only pasta that comes straight from a tree! Uniquely, the healthy, organic food brand leading a revolution for the future of food brings a one-of-a-kind healthy pasta alternative to the market – Organic Green Banana Fusilli Pasta. Made from just one ingredient and nothing else, consumers no longer have to sacrifice their favorite pasta dishes to eat healthy. From today, the new Organic green banana fusilli pasta is available exclusively on Whole Foods Market nationwide. It’s amazingly exfoliating!

The magic begins with freshly harvested whole organic green bananas, packed with all the nutrition, goodness and simplicity that only Mother Nature can provide. It’s a common misconception that green bananas, or unripe bananas, are less desirable, but the truth is that they offer several health benefits such as high levels of iron and potassium and are excellent sources. of fibers. Uniquely partners with its close network of certified organic farms in Mexico and Latin America to source perfect and imperfect fruit. Then, Solely uses its patented cold pressing process to transform the dried green bananas into a traditional Fusilli shape and texture that tastes just right: delicious and flavorful. The dark color Organic Green Banana Fusilli Pasta cooks to an al-dente texture in just four minutes with a rich, classic pasta flavor that pairs perfectly with all your favorite sauces and recipes.

“Basically, we are foodies. Uniquely is constantly looking for ways to rethink the “better for you” food movement in search of foods that are simply “good for you”. We seek to push the boundaries beyond what is just allowed, towards what is genuinely enjoyable while satisfying our need for healthy food,” said Simon Sacal, CEO of Uniquely. “Organic Green Banana Fusilli Pasta does exactly that; it’s a completely different take on traditional pasta but has the same taste and texture one would expect. Eating pasta made from green bananas is a delicious way to add fruit, nutrients, and fiber to your diet, while enjoying simple, minimally processed foods that are better for farmers, the planet, and our communities.

Uniquely Organic Green Banana Fusilli Pasta offers endless culinary possibilities, all with just one nutritious ingredient. Green bananas are a good source of fibre, high in iron and potassium, contain no added sugar and are grain and gluten free. Like all good-for-you products from Solely, Organic Green Banana Fusilli Pasta is Non-GMO Project Verified, USDA Organic, Certified Kosher, and Vegan- and Paleo-Friendly.

Uniquely Organic Green Banana Fusilli Pasta can pick up their boxes for $3.99 at Whole Foods Market stores nationwide starting in October, with online availability later this year www.solely.com. To learn more about Uniquelyplease visit www.solely.com.

About Soly

Uniquely is an innovative, people-driven clean food company rethinking every step of how food is developed, grown, bought, processed and sold. Their mission is to revolutionize the way families consume produce and make simple, clean eating accessible to everyone. Every SKU of their dried fruit, dried fruit, whole fruit gummies, and vegetable and fruit pastes are made with the fewest possible ingredients which are clearly listed on the front of the package to ensure consumer transparency. The company’s planet-focused philosophy is not just about reducing food waste by using perfect and ‘imperfect’ produce, but results in a better quality of life for their farmers. The entire line is USDA Organic, OR Kosher-certified, non-GMO Project Verified, naturally gluten-free, and vegan. For more information on Uniquely, visit www.solely.com.

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Northern Chefs Recognized for Local Ingredients in Globe and Mail’s List of Next Canadian Culinary Stars https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/northern-chefs-recognized-for-local-ingredients-in-globe-and-mails-list-of-next-canadian-culinary-stars/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 18:03:02 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/northern-chefs-recognized-for-local-ingredients-in-globe-and-mails-list-of-next-canadian-culinary-stars/ Eduardo Delascio Burafah, the executive chef of Iqaluit’s Discovery Hotel and Tammattaavik Boarding House, incorporates traditional foods into his cooking and keeps money in the traditional economy. This includes working with local hunters and anglers to offer dishes like caribou and arctic char. Burafah has been highlighted in the Globe and Mail as one of […]]]>

Eduardo Delascio Burafah, the executive chef of Iqaluit’s Discovery Hotel and Tammattaavik Boarding House, incorporates traditional foods into his cooking and keeps money in the traditional economy.

This includes working with local hunters and anglers to offer dishes like caribou and arctic char.

Burafah has been highlighted in the Globe and Mail as one of the country’s next starred chefs. He identified a chief in each province and territory.

Burafah, who grew up in Brazil, learned to cook early in her Italian and Lebanese family.

Although cooking has always been a passion, he first worked as a lawyer before moving to Canada to fulfill his dream of working in the kitchen. He went to culinary school and worked in restaurants in Montreal, before taking a job as a sous chef in Iqaluit in 2017.

It was here that he learned the importance of country foods, most notably in 2018, when a local hunter showed him how to clean a caribou.

“I will never forget this experience,” he said.

Burafah said traditional country foods were something tourists and locals, especially elders, enjoyed.

Some of the partnerships Burafah has engaged in include Project Nunavut, an organization that aims to support projects that improve the traditional economy.

He said it involved him in From lake to platewhere he buys local fish like Arctic char.

Burafah has also partnered with Traditional Nunavut cuisinea butcher shop that sells local products such as muktaaq, caribou and seal.

He said one of the benefits of these programs is the low environmental impact resulting from supporting small-scale harvesting.

Calvin Rossouw is the chef at the Sundog Trading Post in Yellowknife. He has been recognized in the Globe and Mail as one of Canada’s next star chefs. (Luke Carroll/CBC)

Sundog chef recognized for his artisanal ice cream

For the Northwest Territories, The Globe and Mail credited local Yellowknife resident and head of the Sundog Trading Post, Calvin Rossouw.

Rossouw, 27, said he was excited about the news.

“I read this diary growing up,” he said. “And to know that my face was in it was amazing.”

The article featured each chef’s favorite dish, which for Rossouw was ButterBirch Caramel ice cream.

“It’s like a play on a maple pecan, which is pretty standard ice cream, but we made it local and northern,” he said.

Richard McIntosh, owner of Sundog Trading Post, said Rossouw deserved the recognition.

“Her creativity with ice cream flavors is amazing, using local ingredients for more unique flavors,” he said.

“It’s just fantastic.”

Her creativity with ice cream flavors is amazing, using local ingredients for more unique flavors.– Richard McIntosh, owner of Sundog Trading Post

Rossouw has worked in the kitchen since the age of 14, starting at the Black Knight as a dishwasher.

He said he recognized the teamwork involved in running a successful kitchen – a lesson he took with him to each of his future jobs.

“It was watching the guys work during the lunch rush,” he said. “It was amazing to see them work together.”

Rossouw studied Culinary Arts at Niagara College Canada before returning to Yellowknife.

He said he was proud to be recognized, but also proud of what Sundog Trading Post has achieved during its short period of operation, which officially opened in 2021.

But he added that there was more to come.

“We’re only scratching the surface of what we can do here,” he said.

“Especially with our ice cream, we’re really working towards the wholesale product, going into the grocery store and other restaurants.”

Rossouw said there are also plans to extend the opening hours for operations in the evening.

In the Yukon, The Globe and Mail paid tribute to Klayton McColl of Whitehorse, crediting him for incorporating fish, wild game and seasonal berries into various dishes.

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