Cultural Heritage – Sushi Restaurant Albany http://sushirestaurantalbany.com/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 05:46:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Cultural Heritage – Sushi Restaurant Albany http://sushirestaurantalbany.com/ 32 32 Sacred Aboriginal objects returned to central Australia by US university https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/sacred-aboriginal-objects-returned-to-central-australia-by-us-university/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 05:46:06 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/sacred-aboriginal-objects-returned-to-central-australia-by-us-university/ Indigenous sacred objects made a long journey back to central Australia after being repatriated from an American university housing First Nations art. Key points: The Kluge-Ruhe Collection at the University of Virginia specializes in Aboriginal artwork A group of Warlpiri men collected seven artifacts after they were sent to Australia They say they need to […]]]>

Indigenous sacred objects made a long journey back to central Australia after being repatriated from an American university housing First Nations art.

A group of Warlpiri men from Yuendumu, an isolated community about 330 kilometers northwest of Alice Springs, collected the artifacts from the Museum of South Australia and completed the final leg together.

The objects were taken last week from the University of Virginia’s Kluge-Ruhe Collection, which specializes in Aboriginal artwork.

It has over 2,000 items in its collection – the largest of its kind outside Australia.

Warlpiri men collect their cultural heritage material at Alice Springs Airport.(Provided by: Shaun Angeles Penangke)

Warlpiri senior men Geoffrey Jagamara Mathews and Warren Purnpajardu Williams Japanangka said in a statement that they were strong and would resume all business not only in Australia but also overseas.

Community leaders said they were delighted to have the items back in Warlpiri hands, but needed help creating a “storage place for all our gear at home”.

“We also open the doors to other tribes, to help people from other places get their stuff back,” they said.

The return of the seven sacred objects was part of a partnership between the University of Virginia and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies.

The Institute’s chief executive, Craig Ritchie, said the main aim of the program was for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander guardians to make their own decisions about their cultural heritage.

Craig Ritchie stands at a lectern while speaking at the National Native Title Conference in Broome.
Craig Ritchie says returning Indigenous artifacts can be a lot of work.(Provided)

“It’s a lot of negotiation, it’s a lot of work through certain processes in museums and galleries that can be quite arcane,” he said.

Mr Ritchie said international collecting institutions were increasingly willing to facilitate the return of cultural heritage materials to their homes.

“I think there’s a real shift happening in the international collecting community, where there’s a real positive predisposition to return material, because ultimately it helps these institutions…to improve,” did he declare.

A private ceremony will be held to mark the return of Warlpiri materials once the items arrive in the Yuendumu community.

The institute estimates that there are over 112,000 First Nations works from Australia in over 300 collecting institutions overseas.

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Russia pulls off massive art theft in Ukraine https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/russia-pulls-off-massive-art-theft-in-ukraine/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 02:25:22 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/russia-pulls-off-massive-art-theft-in-ukraine/ The looting of art in times of war dates back millennia, with the Greeks and Romans being among the worst perpetrators. Museums and private collections around the world are full of looted works of art that changed hands during conflicts. During World War II, a secret Allied army known as the ‘Monuments Men’ worked to […]]]>

The looting of art in times of war dates back millennia, with the Greeks and Romans being among the worst perpetrators. Museums and private collections around the world are full of looted works of art that changed hands during conflicts. During World War II, a secret Allied army known as the ‘Monuments Men’ worked to protect European treasures from plunder by invading armies, with mixed success. Hitler’s stolen treasures are still being discovered across Germany. Millions of stolen parts may never be found.

So far there are no specially trained armies in Ukraine to protect treasures from Russian precision art thieves working under cover of war to empty museums and destroy important pieces of Ukrainian cultural heritage . There are only brave museum curators in the areas where the Russians have taken over, doing all they can to hide and fortify their art and antiquities, using supplies smuggled in from the West to help them make sandbag paintings and statues.

Since Russia began its invasion in February, 250 cultural institutions have been targeted by Russian munitions. Thousands of important museum pieces were destroyed in the bombings of Mariupol and elsewhere. In Melitopol, Scythian gold artifacts worth millions dating back to the 4th century BC. AD were stolen from boxes in which the museum had hidden them.

Brian Daniels, an anthropologist in Virginia, leads a project that monitors the destruction of cultural heritage in Ukraine. “There is now very strong evidence that this was a deliberate Russian move, with specific paints and adornments being targeted and taken to Russia,” he told The Daily Beast. His team saw surveillance video provided by Ukraine in which a Russian art expert in a white coat removed the gold with the precision of a surgeon, taking care not to destroy it. “It’s possible that this is all part of undermining Ukraine’s identity as a separate country by implicating legitimate Russian ownership of all their exhibits.”

Art historians are extremely concerned that Russia is stealing the soul of the country by destroying these objects. “We have museum buildings destroyed, all the collections burnt down, it’s a pretty barbaric situation,” curator and art historian Konstantin Akinsha, an expert on Ukrainian art, told Australia’s ABC Roundtable program. “[The] The other side of the problem is that in the small towns occupied by the Russians we have the first cases of random looting of museums.

A worker walks past display cases and protectively wrapped furniture in one of the galleries of Potocki Palace, one of western Ukraine’s architectural gems and home of the Lviv National Art Gallery in Lviv May 13, 2022.

Photo by Yuriy Dyachyshyn/AFP via Getty Images

In many cases across Ukraine, museum directors have refused to evacuate without their art and therefore huddle in fortified museums. “Admins cannot leave the building because [they will need to] come back at night in case something happens,” said Akinsha, who is in contact with many of them. “So they became sort of cave hermits… all over the country.”

Among the destroyed artworks are 25 works by Ukrainian artist Maria Prymachenko that were in the Ivankiv Museum near Kyiv. Ukrainian officials say the art was taken by Russian troops before they destroyed the museum in a missile attack.

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View from the window of the Theater Square, sandbags barricade the sculpture-fountain “Molodist”, and the windows of the Museum of the Sea Fleet of Ukraine are covered with boards. Ukrainian authorities in Odessa have set up barricades in the historic center to protect key sites and monuments in the event of Russian shelling or possible street fighting.

Photo by Viacheslav Onyshchenko/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

The ALIPH Foundation, which has worked tirelessly in conflict zones such as Syria and Afghanistan, where untold treasures have been destroyed over the past decades, said it was sending supplies such as boxes, blankets fire retardants and packing materials to Ukrainian museums to help them fortify the works in the event of a bomb attack. keep on going.

“The storage facilities themselves must comply with the standards,” ALIPH spokeswoman Sandra Bialystok said in a statement posted on their website. “They need to have good humidity control, be out of the elements, and the packing boxes need to be of a certain caliber in order to protect the artifacts because these artifacts are, of course, valuable and fragile.”

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Online Edition – Specialized Course on Cultural Heritage, Crime and Security: Protecting Our Past to Invest in Our Future https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/online-edition-specialized-course-on-cultural-heritage-crime-and-security-protecting-our-past-to-invest-in-our-future/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 05:33:28 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/online-edition-specialized-course-on-cultural-heritage-crime-and-security-protecting-our-past-to-invest-in-our-future/ The protection of cultural heritage is an essential element within the framework of the United Nations sustainable development agenda, as stated in goal 11 by which countries have committed to “make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable”. In particular, Target 11.4 of Goal 11 aims to “strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard […]]]>

The protection of cultural heritage is an essential element within the framework of the United Nations sustainable development agenda, as stated in goal 11 by which countries have committed to “make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable”. In particular, Target 11.4 of Goal 11 aims to “strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage”.

On this point, the number of international crimes related to the looting and trafficking of cultural heritage property has increased considerably. Moreover, their links to international criminal activities, including the financing of terrorist groups, are becoming more evident with each passing year.

The deep concern of the United Nations on this subject is also demonstrated by the adoption, over the last decades, of various conventions which refer to these phenomena as essential elements of the international crime model. The year 2020 marked the 50th anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property.

With these considerations in mind, the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI), in cooperation with the American University of Rome (AUR), is organizing the third edition of the Specialized Heritage Course Culture, Crime and Security – Protecting our Past to Invest in our Future which will be delivered online, November 7-11, 2022.

The course will provide participants with a fundamental understanding of heritage crime and how heritage organisations, law enforcement and justice systems respond to this issue. The course curriculum is likely to include the following topics:

  • Protection of cultural property: the international legal framework
  • Counter the looting
  • Understanding Criminal Trafficking Networks
  • Tourism security plans: the importance of protecting cultural heritage
  • Armed conflicts, peacebuilding and protection of cultural heritage
  • Protecting museums and heritage sites
  • Heritage and Stability Police
  • Building communities and supporting development through cultural heritage

The specialized course offers professional, legal, social, scientific and academic perspectives through live webinars, group discussions, dynamic case studies, individual readings and practical exercises. The faculty is made up of eminent academics and scholars from the AUR and other universities, as well as international legal experts from the United Nations system, international and non-governmental organizations, and civil society.

Through a dedicated online platform, participants will have the opportunity to interact with internationally recognized experts and peers from around the world, in order to build lasting professional relationships.

This experience promotes intercultural dialogue and promotes a better understanding of the most salient issues facing the international community in the areas of cultural heritage, crime and security.

Course methodology

This course is delivered online. It combines live webinars in our virtual classroom, led by subject matter experts, with self-paced activities and interactive group discussions.

Live webinars take place on a dedicated online platform. Participants need a computer (recommended) or mobile device with audio and video capability, a headset with microphone to connect to audio through the computer or mobile device, and reliable internet connection. We recommend accessing the audio through the computer. No special software is required. Upon acceptance of the course, participants will receive the necessary information to access the platform.

The live webinars take place from 2:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Rome time (8:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. New York time), Monday through Friday. Please note that recorded webinars will be available on demand.

Entry requirements

The course, organized by the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI), in cooperation with the American University of Rome (AUR), is designed for university graduates in law, political science, relations international studies, economics, social sciences, culture Heritage, museum studies, archeology and other relevant disciplines. It is also aimed at young professionals working in government institutions, local authorities, international and non-governmental organizations, museums, heritage sites and cultural institutions seeking to deepen their understanding of the most salient issues facing the international community. faces in terms of cultural heritage, crime and security.

Applicants must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • Hold a three-year university degree from an internationally recognized university in one of the above fields;
  • Have a very good working knowledge of English.

Applications from students planning to graduate at the end of the 2022/23 academic year will also be considered.

Certificate of attendance

After attending all live webinars and completing course activities and assignments, participants will receive a certificate of participation from the United Nations and the American University of Rome.

Fee Information

The registration fee is 800 euros.

Registration fees include:

– Tuition
– Course support in electronic version
– Sessions recorded and made available for later viewing (upon request)

Cancellation and refunds
In accordance with our general policy, in the event of cancellation of your participation, the registration fees will not be refunded under any circumstances.
Given the current exceptional circumstances, however, full reimbursement of the registration fee will be guaranteed if the cancellation is related to the Corona virus crisis (i.e. health issues of the participant or spouse/partner registered/children or parents). Proof of this reason must be provided when requesting reimbursement.

How to register

How to register

  • Application Deadline: Please complete and send the application form to unicri.courses@un.org by 23 October 2022
  • Confirmation of acceptance: the results of the selection process will be communicated by e-mail, within 5 working days of receipt of the application, and no later than October 24, 2022.
  • Payment deadline: Full payment must be finalized within one week of confirmation of acceptance, and no later than October 26, 2022 (i.e. applicants must provide UNICRI with proof of payment by e-mail to unicri.courses@un.org).

Application 2022.doc

contacts

Email: unicri.courses@un.org (please indicate “Cultural Heritage” in the subject of the email). Tel: (+39) 011 6537157 or (+39) 011 6537111

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UNESCO supports Ukrainian women artists in exile https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/unesco-supports-ukrainian-women-artists-in-exile/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 13:20:34 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/unesco-supports-ukrainian-women-artists-in-exile/ UNESCO is launching a support program for Ukrainian women artists who have had to flee their country because of the war, in partnership with the NGO Artists at Risk. It will allow them, as well as their children, to be welcomed and cared for by a cultural institution in the country where they have found […]]]>

UNESCO is launching a support program for Ukrainian women artists who have had to flee their country because of the war, in partnership with the NGO Artists at Risk.

It will allow them, as well as their children, to be welcomed and cared for by a cultural institution in the country where they have found refuge.

UNESCO has decided to launch a program dedicated to Ukrainian women artists in exile, born of a partnership with the NGO Perpetuum Mobile, initiator of the Artists at Risk platform, which brings together cultural institutions from more than 15 countries.

The artists concerned will be accompanied for at least three months by a cultural institution in their host country. They will be cared for with their children in artistic residences and will benefit from support in terms of networking, visibility and the design of new cultural projects.

The scheme will aim to give them the means to become independent at the end of their reception period, whether they then choose to return to live in Ukraine or to settle permanently in their host country.

UNESCO has already set aside $140,000 to fund the program, which should initially benefit around 30 artists and their children.

The program completes the range of emergency measures already deployed by UNESCO since the beginning of the war to safeguard tangible and intangible cultural heritage, secure museum collections and combat the illicit trafficking of cultural property.

Moreover, since the start of the war in Ukraine, UNESCO has been monitoring the situation of artists in close consultation with the networks of artists and cultural actors in the country.

This work is also carried out in coordination with international organizations involved in supporting artists at risk: PEN America’s Artists at Risk Connection, Perpetuum Mobile/Artists at Risk, ICORN, Freemuse, Prince Claus Fund and the PAUSE program.

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Release of three picture books on the Tibetan legend https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/release-of-three-picture-books-on-the-tibetan-legend/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 13:49:00 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/release-of-three-picture-books-on-the-tibetan-legend/ The three picture books about the legendary Tibetan hero Gesar. With “King Gesar: Trials and Tribulations”, a film made for children about the legendary Tibetan hero Gesar, which will be released soon, the China Welfare Institute Publishing House has released three picture books based on on the movie. The film and books aim to promote […]]]>

The three picture books about the legendary Tibetan hero Gesar.

With “King Gesar: Trials and Tribulations”, a film made for children about the legendary Tibetan hero Gesar, which will be released soon, the China Welfare Institute Publishing House has released three picture books based on on the movie.

The film and books aim to promote Tibetan culture and celebrate China’s diversity.

King Gesar is reputed to be the longest epic in the world, with around a million lines. The epic, believed to date from the 12th century, describes the heroic deeds of cultural hero Gesar, the fearless lord of the legendary Ling Kingdom.

It is inherited mainly through the art of vocal singing and is said to be on par with the epic works of Homer in ancient Greece and the “epic of Gilgamesh” of ancient Sumer. In 2009, it was inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

The three books titled “King Gesar: the Young Hero” describe the life of the hero, including his birth, his suffering and his fight against the forces of evil, where he led the people of his tribe to live a peaceful and prosperous life. .

They are meant to encourage children to be brave and generous like Gesar and inspire them to think of solutions to life’s problems.

The colorful and vivid images in the books exhibit the characteristics of traditional Tibetan thangka artwork. Readers can enjoy the typical Tibetan landscape, including snow-capped mountains, lush steppes, endless flower clusters, tents, yaks, prayer flags, and snow lotuses.

The texts of the book include lines of vocal songs that are popular folk songs in Tibet today.

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France suspends former beleaguered Louvre director Jean-Luc Martinez from his post as ambassador, creates task force on art trafficking https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/france-suspends-former-beleaguered-louvre-director-jean-luc-martinez-from-his-post-as-ambassador-creates-task-force-on-art-trafficking/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 21:42:59 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/france-suspends-former-beleaguered-louvre-director-jean-luc-martinez-from-his-post-as-ambassador-creates-task-force-on-art-trafficking/ Under the heading “Situation of Mr. Jean-Luc Martinez”, the French Ministry of Culture announced that the former director of the Louvre would be placed on temporary leave from his role as ambassador of cultural heritage “pending clarification on his legal status”. Friday’s announcement follows recent charges against Martinez for alleged complicity in organized fraud and […]]]>

Under the heading “Situation of Mr. Jean-Luc Martinez”, the French Ministry of Culture announced that the former director of the Louvre would be placed on temporary leave from his role as ambassador of cultural heritage “pending clarification on his legal status”.

Friday’s announcement follows recent charges against Martinez for alleged complicity in organized fraud and money laundering.

Martinez is involved in a tangled worldwide investigation into works stolen from Egypt, purchased by the Louvre Abu Dhabi. Through his lawyers, he denied any wrongdoing.

Until his suspension last week, Martinez served as France’s ambassador for international cooperation in cultural heritage, tasked with fighting art trafficking. From 2013 to 2021, he directed the Louvre and the scientific committee of Agency France-Musées, which certified the pedigree of several now suspect works. The Louvre in Paris and the Louvre Abu Dhabi each brought civil action in this case.

The new French Minister of Culture, Rima Abdul Malak, also announced the creation of a working group to examine how illicit cultural objects are acquired and through what “legal framework”, according to a second press release on Friday. These conclusions, which must be delivered before the start of the summer, are expected because “threats to the provenance of cultural property are increasingly sophisticated and complex to thwart”, the ministry said.

In its remarks, the government also “reminds” the public of “France’s firm commitment to the fight against the trafficking of cultural property”, and referred to two recent conferences on the subject, held in February and March this year. . However, in another ironic twist, Martinez himself was among the main speakers at the multilateral meeting in February, which discussed “strengthening European cooperation” against art trafficking.

Indeed, while these conferences were taking place in Europe, French and American investigators were already busy unraveling at least one smuggling ring and their facilitating dealers who sold ancient works worth millions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Louvre Abu Dabi. This net was started by Manhattan DA Antiques Trafficking Unit Chief Matthew Bogdanosand more recently included the confiscation of five Egyptian artifacts from the Met.

To lead the new working group, the French Ministry of Culture has appointed three people: Arnaud Oseredczuk, member of the Ethics Committee of the Ministry of Culture; Married-Christina Labourdette, President of the Château de Fontainebleau; and christian GiacomottoChairman of the Investment Bankers Supervisory Board Gimar and Co. and Chairman of Agency France Museums audit committee. The three will work in tandem with the Ministry’s General Inspectorate of Cultural Affairs.

A receptionist for Giacomotto told Artnet News it was too early for him to comment on the new mission. It is not clear if At Giacomotto’s Login to Agency France-Musées presents a conflict of all kinds.

The group recently made headlines for certifying the authenticity of ancient works of art despite numerous irregularities and false documents linked to their provenance, according to the French daily. Release.

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Russian general reportedly killed in Ukraine https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/russian-general-reportedly-killed-in-ukraine/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 04:55:07 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/russian-general-reportedly-killed-in-ukraine/ Russian General Roman Kutuzov was killed on the battlefield in the Donbass region of eastern Ukraine, state media reported on Sunday. If confirmed by the Russian military, Kutuzov would be at least the fourth Russian general killed in more than three months of fighting in Ukraine. “On the one hand, the general had led soldiers […]]]>

Russian General Roman Kutuzov was killed on the battlefield in the Donbass region of eastern Ukraine, state media reported on Sunday.

If confirmed by the Russian military, Kutuzov would be at least the fourth Russian general killed in more than three months of fighting in Ukraine.

“On the one hand, the general had led soldiers on the attack, as if there were not enough colonels,” reported Alexander Sladkov, a war correspondent for state radio Rossia.

“On the other hand, Roman was a commander like everyone else, albeit with a higher rank,” Sladkov wrote on his Telegram channel.

Kutuzov had commanded the self-proclaimed 1st Army Corps of the Donetsk People’s Republic, according to Ukrainian naval infantry officer Dmitry Ivanov.

Kutuzov had ordered his troops to storm a settlement in the Donetsk region on Sunday and “was forced to lead the assault, coming to the front line,” Ivanov wrote on Facebook.

Russian media reported three deaths among its generals in more than three months of fighting.

The Ukrainian general staff claims the death of at least 12 Russian generals.

At least 317 Russian officers have been killed in Ukraine, a third of them majors, lieutenant colonels and colonels, independent Russian media reported in April, citing publicly available data.

Reported deaths of senior Russian officers have reduced the military’s ability to plan and execute military operations and dealt a blow to frontline morale, analysts told the Moscow Times.

Other investigative bodies have identified and verified the deaths of more than 3,000 Russian soldiers, a figure that exceeds official estimates by the Russian Defense Ministry.

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The painter Adrian Ghenie: “I wanted to play directly in the fabric of the building” https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/the-painter-adrian-ghenie-i-wanted-to-play-directly-in-the-fabric-of-the-building/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 04:00:45 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/the-painter-adrian-ghenie-i-wanted-to-play-directly-in-the-fabric-of-the-building/ “The Martyrdom of Father Pino Puglisi” by Adrian Ghenie (2020) © Rosellina Garbo ‘The Crucifixion’ (2019) © Rosellina Garbo The work of Romanian painter Adrian Ghenie is certainly very impactful. It hits you right between the eyes and somewhere in the stomach. His bubbling canvases, with figures and faces often worked in frenetic abstraction, have […]]]>

“The Martyrdom of Father Pino Puglisi” by Adrian Ghenie (2020) © Rosellina Garbo

‘The Crucifixion’ (2019) © Rosellina Garbo

The work of Romanian painter Adrian Ghenie is certainly very impactful. It hits you right between the eyes and somewhere in the stomach. His bubbling canvases, with figures and faces often worked in frenetic abstraction, have the colorful charge of the Renaissance and Baroque paintings he loves, the story of Delacroix, minute details drawn from Flemish scenes, and nods to Van Gogh, Courbet and Rousseau. , all taking place in multiple layers of imagery, much of it taken from the internet.

You could say he makes art about art. Before painting, he creates elaborate paper collages, moving images around until he finds the perfect fit. “It’s like working with Lego,” he says. “Everything has to fit together.” Then he worked intensively and alone in his Berlin studio, producing no more than 15 pieces a year.

Today two major paintings he made in 2019 and 2020 can be seen in the Chiesa della Madonna della Mazza in Palermo. The 17th-century church sits on the city’s busy via Maqueda, surrounded by shops selling slices of pizza, shoes, eyewear and shiny dresses. The huge canvases, custom-made to fit the vaulted chapels on either side of the altar, appear at first glance to conform to traditional subjects of religious art and stylistically in sympathy with the baroque architecture of the church. “I wanted,” says Ghenie, “to play directly into the fabric of the building.”

Get closer, however, and something more surprising begins to emerge. If we have become immune to the blood and guts of historical religious art, then Ghenie might just lift us out of our apathy. “These images are taken from real life,” he says.

Adrian Ghenie used modern imagery in his paintings © Alessandra d’Urso

On the left are two figures, each attached to a cross, one wrapped in a bright orange body bag; another dressed in Adidas track pants. They are victims of Christian crucifixions perpetrated in Syria in 2015. On the right is Padre Pino Puglisi, the Catholic priest murdered by the Mafia in Palermo in 1993. Facing his killer, his dignified position – outstretched hand – is that of Saint Augustine in Michael Pacher’s painting of Saint Augustine and the Devil of 1483; behind him are the public housing and corrugated iron fences of the impoverished neighborhood of Brancaccio where he preached and fell.

“I wanted baroque, classical,” says Ghenie, “but with a journalistic and cinematic touch.” The devil, who holds the gun, is dressed in a lemon yellow down jacket. “The color of jealousy”, says the artist. Beneath it is a swirling intestinal mass.

The church was built between 1603 and 1606, as a place of respite for the city’s poor. Like many others in the Sicilian town, it had been empty and abandoned for 40 years. But when Ghenie met Italian writer and curator Alessandra Borghese (from the aristocratic Borghese family) at a dinner party in Paris in 2017, he told her he wanted to do a painting in a church. “I wanted to follow the path of Caravaggio and Michelangelo, to create something for eternity,” he says.

Borghese, who lives between Rome, Paris and also Palermo – and, thanks to her grandmother, Principessa Sofia Lanza di Trabia, is a quarter Sicilian – has secured the support of Father Giuseppe Bucaro. The brilliant director of the cultural heritage department of the Archdiocese of Palermo helped her find a suitable church, while Ghenie gallerist Thaddaeus Ropac also offered his support. “The first church we saw looked like a garage with an altar,” says Ghenie. “Then we came here, and I saw the two chapels and I knew it was true.”

A detail from 'La Crucifixion' by Ghenie

Detail of ‘The Crucifixion’ by Ghenie © Rosellina Garbo

A detail from 'The Martyrdom of Father Pino Puglisi'

Detail of ‘The Martyrdom of Father Pino Puglisi’ © Rosellina Garbo

The Chiesa della Madonna della Mazza took almost three years to be renovated and now, painted in pale grey, white and yellow, it has fully regained its Baroque elegance. Its original works of art, including those by artists Battistello and Zoppo di Gangi, are being restored; another from the School of Caravaggio has been reinstalled in its original location, to the right of Padre Puglisi.

The church officially reopens to the citizens of Palermo on June 9, although in recent months the doors have sometimes been ajar and passers-by seem magnetically drawn inside by Ghenie’s works, which literally shine at the back of the nave. When I visited Ghenie and Borghese, several locals came in, looked at the paintings carefully and for a long time, then knelt down to pray.

“So many Palermitans will come here and remember their own losses,” says Borghese. “Although my mother was worried about the weapon,” she said of the solid black gun in the assassin’s hand. “But it is the tool that delivers today’s martyr,” Ghenie continues. (Puglisi was beatified in 2013 by the Catholic Church.)

Ghenie was born in the small Romanian town of Baia Mare in 1977, under the communist dictatorship of Nicolae Ceausescu. “Palermo is like Bucharest in the 1980s,” he says. “Not everything was rebuilt in shiny, plastic materials. Although Palermo is more sensual. It’s very southern and textured. Borghese describes it as an open city, on the borders of Europe, outward-looking, tolerant and inclusive.

Her family is Orthodox Christian, but religion has never played a big role in her life, nor has communism. “People expect communism to be tumultuous, but it’s incredibly quiet,” he says. “We lived in a kind of silence. When Ceausescu was overthrown in 1989, things became even calmer.

He attended an art school in the northwestern city of Cluj after selling his first painting at the age of 16. “I rented a space and organized an exhibition,” he tells me. “I sold seven works—winter landscapes—for $50 each. I just wanted people to see my work. By the age of 39 his paintings were selling at international auction houses for over £3million.

‘Degenerate Art’ (2016) sold for over $9 million last month

Last month, at Sotheby’s in New York, a work called “Degenerate Art”, made in 2016, sold for more than 9 million dollars. There he reworked Van Gogh’s famous 1889 self-portrait, with its pastel blue and green tones, in a riot of yellow, purple and red, synthesizing his own painterly self with that of the troubled Dutchman.

Such exorbitant prices can complicate a painter’s career, especially one who wants to be judged on his art, not his public presence. “The kind of success that comes with the art world is more suited to extroverts,” says Ghenie, who prefers being in her studio to being in the spotlight. With this project, he got out of this system: the paintings of the Chiesa della Madonna will never be put up for sale. “It is above all a gift to the people of Palermo,” says Borghese.

Nevertheless, the art world will come, as it will see the Chapelle Rothko in Houston and the Chapelle du Rosaire in Vence with its murals and stained glass windows by Henri Matisse. “It will make the city a place of artistic pilgrimage,” says Borghese, who has already worked hard to put it on the cultural map. (She staged the first African opera, with a libretto in Sahelian dialects, at the Teatro Massimo in 2018.) Ghenie, however, will be back in her studio, palette knife in hand, researching her next project, applying painting on canvas, making we think.

fondazionegheniechapels.org

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Acropolis lighting project wins LIT award for 2021 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/acropolis-lighting-project-wins-lit-award-for-2021/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 13:41:35 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/acropolis-lighting-project-wins-lit-award-for-2021/ The Acropolis of Athens. Photo source: @Ministry of Culture Eleftheria Deko & Associates won the LIT Lighting Designer of the Year Award 2021 in Heritage lighting for the Athens Acropolis lighting design project. The historic monument’s new lighting was unveiled last September as part of a series of restoration projects to improve the archaeological site. […]]]>

The Acropolis of Athens. Photo source: @Ministry of Culture

Eleftheria Deko & Associates won the LIT Lighting Designer of the Year Award 2021 in Heritage lighting for the Athens Acropolis lighting design project.

The historic monument’s new lighting was unveiled last September as part of a series of restoration projects to improve the archaeological site.

The team behind Acropolis’ lighting design is led by an Emmy Award-winning artist Eleftheria Deko who received the award at a special ceremony at the Acropolis Museum earlier this week.

Eleftheria Deko. Photo source: @LIT Lighting Design Awards / Photography: @gavriiLux & Ioanna Paka

On the LIT Awards website, Eleftheria Deko & Associates describes the project as an effort to “highlight the beauty of the architecture, the timelessness of the carvings, the whiteness of the Pendelikon marble in contrast to the ruggedness of the sacred rock, and the ‘heroism of the fortification walls’.

The company adds, “We achieved differentiation by using different focus angles, color temperatures and light intensity. Our lighting vision was to make the site look exceptional at night in multiple directions, near and far, and to breathe new life into the monuments of the Acropolis.”

Culture Minister Lina Mendoni, Onassis Foundation President Anthony Papadimitriou, lighting designer Eleftheria Deko. Photo source: @LIT Lighting Design Awards / Photography: @gavriiLux & Ioanna Paka

The project was made possible thanks to the support of the Onassis Foundation under the supervision of the services of the Greek Ministry of Culture.

“This work has been recognized by art and lighting experts around the world. The light from the Acropolis now “travels” around the world, highlighting the most important monument of Western civilization and promoting the cultural heritage of Greece,” said the Minister of Culture. Lina Mendoni said.

The Acropolis, Athens Photo: @Ministry of Culture / © Studio On_Stelios Tzetzias

Based in Switzerland, the LIT Lighting Design Awards were created to recognize the efforts of talented international lighting product designers and lighting directors. It also aims to celebrate creativity and innovation in the areas of lighting products and applications.


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On the occasion of “International Day of Mount Everest” (May 29), “The Art Maze”, by curator Marcus Schaefer, unveils the latest masterpiece by artist Sacha Jafri as a first-ever event at the Mount Everest https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/on-the-occasion-of-international-day-of-mount-everest-may-29-the-art-maze-by-curator-marcus-schaefer-unveils-the-latest-masterpiece-by-artist-sacha-jafri-as-a/ Tue, 31 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/on-the-occasion-of-international-day-of-mount-everest-may-29-the-art-maze-by-curator-marcus-schaefer-unveils-the-latest-masterpiece-by-artist-sacha-jafri-as-a/ KATMANDU, Nepal–(BUSINESS WIRE)–‘The Art Maze’ World Tour, in partnership with UNESCO, is an unpresented collection of 50 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, created by renowned artist Sacha Jafri, to celebrate the 50th World Heritage Site of UNESCO.e anniversary and The Next 50, a year-long UNESCO campaign promoting interdisciplinary thinking about the future of World Heritage. Jafri, […]]]>

KATMANDU, Nepal–(BUSINESS WIRE)–‘The Art Maze’ World Tour, in partnership with UNESCO, is an unpresented collection of 50 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, created by renowned artist Sacha Jafri, to celebrate the 50th World Heritage Site of UNESCO.e anniversary and The Next 50, a year-long UNESCO campaign promoting interdisciplinary thinking about the future of World Heritage.

Jafri, awarded by the UN for his humanitarian work raising more than 140 million dollars for charitable causes, unveils his painting “Sagarmatha National Park – Mount Everest”, a spectacular triptych of 380 cm x 160 cm on three canvases. With this project, Jafri aims to reconnect humanity to our cultural heritage, our ancestral past and the beauty that surrounds us in our natural world, as well as to shine a light on the important conversations and actions so desperately needed for the future. future of our world, in the areas of equality, sustainability and climate change.

Sacha Jafri, Artist & Philanthropist: “It is such an honor for me to partner with ‘The Art Maze’ and UNESCO in using the power of art to reconnect with humanity in space and on earth.”

Marcus Schaefer, art visionary and curator: “Feeling such a strong connection to this great country, we are thrilled to unveil Sacha’s latest painting featuring the people of Nepal on majestic Mount Everest.”

Michael Croft, Head of Office and Representative in Nepal at UNESCO: “As we listen to communities in mountain regions and hear their perspective on tackling the twin challenges of climate change and sustainable tourism, we are both motivated – and better informed – about how best to shape our own actions for change.”

UNESCO’s partnership with “The Art Maze” and Sacha Jafri reinforces its mission to promote inclusive and interdisciplinary dialogues related to climate change, heritage conservation, sustainable tourism and the challenges these sites face in the context of climate change. In Nepal, UNESCO is working to bring together leaders of mountain communities through The Next 50 dialogues.

Raza Beig, President of BoredPuma: “So delighted to be able to announce my purchase of this monumental painting – I now own a piece by a living Indian master, Sacha Jafri, but also the artistic expression of the world’s greatest natural beauty – Mount Everest.”

In honor of this cause, Jafri produces a collection of iconic prints for art lovers who want to own a piece of his humanitarian journey. They can be found at: https://www.collection.theartmaze.com/

‘The Art Maze’ visits 18 countries on six continents of the world 2022-2024 with the next stop in Paris, September 2022, at UNESCO Headquarters commemorating 50 years of the organizatione anniversary with the 50 paintings by Jafri exhibited.

Follow ‘The Labyrinth of Art’

WEBSITE: www.theartmaze.com

@sachajafri @the.artmaze

Download images and movies HERE

*Source: AETOFil

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