Regional Cuisine – Sushi Restaurant Albany http://sushirestaurantalbany.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:21:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Regional Cuisine – Sushi Restaurant Albany http://sushirestaurantalbany.com/ 32 32 Two Stark County restaurants hope to expand https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/two-stark-county-restaurants-hope-to-expand/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:00:29 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/two-stark-county-restaurants-hope-to-expand/ Tlaquepaque Mexican Restaurant, at 4262 Portage St. NW in Jackson Township, and Rivers Bend Ice Cream & Country Diner, at 11934 Union Ave. NE in Lexington Township, both hope to add to their restaurants. The agenda of the regional planning commission from mid-November included requests for expansion of the two restaurants. Tlaquepaque requested an addition […]]]>

Tlaquepaque Mexican Restaurant, at 4262 Portage St. NW in Jackson Township, and Rivers Bend Ice Cream & Country Diner, at 11934 Union Ave. NE in Lexington Township, both hope to add to their restaurants.

The agenda of the regional planning commission from mid-November included requests for expansion of the two restaurants.

Tlaquepaque requested an addition to the restaurant and patio, while Rivers Bend requested an addition to the restaurant, porch and parking lot.

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Tlaquepaque on Portage is one of three Tlaquepaque restaurants in Stark County. The others are located at 2682 Easton St. NE at Oakwood Square in Plain Township and 4460 Dressler Road NW in Jackson Township. The restaurant serves authentic Mexican cuisine.

Rivers Bend Ice Cream and Country Diner in Lexington Township is an independent family restaurant serving breakfast and lunch.

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A selection of this year’s cookbooks https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/a-selection-of-this-years-cookbooks/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 01:09:28 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/a-selection-of-this-years-cookbooks/ The revolving doors of the 1990s restaurant scene saw a cast of great characters, sadly in decline. One of the greatest champions of the so-called “modern British” movement, Terence Conran, is gone; we lost Alastair Little and Andrew Edmunds, and only last month Joyce Molyneux, from Carved Angel. Who? What? If you’ve never eaten at […]]]>

The revolving doors of the 1990s restaurant scene saw a cast of great characters, sadly in decline. One of the greatest champions of the so-called “modern British” movement, Terence Conran, is gone; we lost Alastair Little and Andrew Edmunds, and only last month Joyce Molyneux, from Carved Angel. Who? What? If you’ve never eaten at the restaurant on Little’s Frith Street, tasted Simon Hopkinson’s delights in Bibendum or walked through the doors of Rowley Leigh’s Kensington Place, you’ll wonder what I’m talking about.

With the skyrocketing price of butter, it’s cheaper to make it yourself, which is a nice and easy process to do.

Call it a movement, a style – it laid the foundation for everything good to eat in Britain today: the best ingredients, the freshest, the most carefully selected, cooked simply. We’re so used to finding seasonal food in pubs and high street restaurants that it’s easy to forget that in the early 1990s there were only about four decent restaurants in London. These modern British chefs changed their menus frequently, even daily, and had produce delivered directly from farmers, fishermen and walled gardens. They nodded to Mediterranean ingredients and read Elizabeth David. They were more relaxed than those chasing Michelin stars and often cooked in full view of their customers. And they tended to wear a commis chef’s apron rather than chef’s whites. One of their greatest accomplishments was to (almost) end the French sneer.

It is therefore possible that Jeremy Lee Cook simply and well, for one or more (Fourth Estate, £30) is perhaps the last truly ‘modern British’ cookbook. Lee is the head chef at Quo Vadis in Soho and was previously Conran’s favorite, cooking at the Blueprint Café for 16 years. His smoked eel sandwich is on the menu at Quo Vadis every day. It also appears in this beautiful book, a book for serious cooks to collect as well as a great read, with recipes (mostly simple) that are right at home in a home, so to speak. Don’t be alarmed by instructions such as using strawberries that didn’t rain the night before. He teases you.

If Lee is a relative of Britain’s finest food, Angela Hartnett is one of his offspring. Yes, she has won many stars, but she has a lot of experience in home cooking, having Italian grandparents. The weekend cook: Good food for real life (Bloomsbury, £26) is the very useful book I dreamed she would write. It’s as much a love letter to her neighbors, friends, and most importantly, her husband, as it is a terrific collection of recipes for the non-cooker food they eat together. You can trust Hartnett’s Scotch Egg Method as much as his gnocchi and floating islands.

On the Himalayan Trail by Romy Gill (Hardie Grant, £27) has the essential “by gosh!” factor. We may think we know everything there is to know about South Asian cuisine, but here we discover the cuisine of Kashmir and Ladakh in a real gastronomic travelogue that describes the regional cuisine of remote places and tells a story passionately and visually. The meat recipes are perfect for the moment: pan-fried lamb chops with spices, lamb in milk, meatballs stuffed with apricots, chicken cooked in yogurt, all the comforts of an austere autumn.

Like butter, which is celebrated by The viewer’s food writer Olivia Potts in Butter: a party (Title, £26). This year, the price of butter has risen alarmingly, prompting a slew of articles suggesting it’s cheaper to make your own. I wrote one, and it does – but only if you do it with the cheapest cream. It’s actually a lovely, easy-to-do process, and Potts gives various homemade butter recipes, including one made with a combination of cream and crème fraîche, which I find is the best for baking. Her Hollandaise recipe is a triumph, as close to fail-safe as it gets for this delicate sauce; and there are other delights, like the dal makhani and the magnificent monte cristos – fried sandwiches that combine French toast with croque monsieur.

In a year when families are said to be afraid to use their ovens due to high energy costs, Catherine Phipps’s Modern Pressure Cooking (Hardie Grant, £26) couldn’t be timed better. My mother-in-law had a pressure cooker, and we were terrified of her noisy jigging, and equally horrified by the gray cabbage lingering inside. But when you realize that you can save three-fifths on the cooking time of a beef stew, for example, the pressure cooker becomes relevant again. Phipps’ advice on how to use an electric correctly is gratifyingly authoritative – the skill is to cook quickly without burning. And there’s more to pressure cooking than oxtail stew. Recipes here include pasta and rice dishes, black bean tacos, stuffed peppers, and roasted eggplant with miso and honey. It is a new generation kitchen, which is really worth it.

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“Nistisima” means “Lent”, referring to fasting food in the Greek Orthodox Church. But at Georgina Hayden Nistisima: the secret to delicious vegan cuisine from the Mediterranean and beyond (Bloomsbury, £26) This is ‘accidental’ vegan cooking, ideal for plant-only eaters and a back-up remedy for those who want to feed vegan friends with meals they’d be happy to eat themselves. In other words, no meat imitation; just good food that happens to be made from plants. Hayden – who has Greek heritage, claims to adhere to fasting days and remembers her family using almond milk before it was fashionable – has unearthed a host of delicious plant-based Mediterranean recipes.

Dishes we have long taken for granted are explored in A brief history of pasta: the Italian cuisine that shaped the world by food historian Luca Cesari (Profile Books, £16.99). The journey to our concept of spaghetti bolognese or lasagna, for example, is told as a slowly evolving chronicle, backed by documentation and great research. Many pasta recipes that have become legendary aren’t actually widely eaten in Italy, but are the brainchild of nostalgic migrants – especially American classics such as fettuccine Alfredo, with its creamy cheese sauce, originally invented in a Roman restaurant populated by celebrities. And of course, pre-modern Britons believed that spaghetti bolognese was an authentic Italian dish. It’s not: spaghetti is pasta from the south, while meat sauces tend to come from the north. But we are now so knowledgeable about food culture that to see the words “spaghetti bolognese” on a menu today has become almost offensive.

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A meal and drink at Chesapeake’s Sakura, plus a quick guide to Thanksgiving – The Virginian-Pilot https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/a-meal-and-drink-at-chesapeakes-sakura-plus-a-quick-guide-to-thanksgiving-the-virginian-pilot/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 04:31:56 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/a-meal-and-drink-at-chesapeakes-sakura-plus-a-quick-guide-to-thanksgiving-the-virginian-pilot/ It’s hard to believe that sushi wasn’t as common in the American diet as it is today. Spurred on by the scene of Molly Ringwald eating the Japanese staple in the classic 1985 film “The Breakfast Club,” I sought out sushi in my native Atlanta. There weren’t many places at the time, but I found […]]]>

It’s hard to believe that sushi wasn’t as common in the American diet as it is today.

Spurred on by the scene of Molly Ringwald eating the Japanese staple in the classic 1985 film “The Breakfast Club,” I sought out sushi in my native Atlanta. There weren’t many places at the time, but I found one and was quickly confused.

But over the past 40 years, I’ve learned to navigate sushi menus, like many people, and learned to love it along the way.

I’m pretty picky about sushi, at least nothing in a convenience store please. I definitely have my favorite Japanese restaurants in the area, and Sakura (meaning cherry blossom in Japanese) is one of them.

Sakura offers both sushi and sashimi, à la carte and for dinner.

What is the difference? While seafood is the main ingredient, sushi is traditionally rolled in nori – or a seaweed wrap – and contains vinegared rice, usually around the outside. It is then cut into bite-size pieces. Not all sushi contains seafood. Sashimi is thinly sliced ​​seafood or raw meat, offered as is.

Among Sakura’s sushi, classic, special and vegetable rolls are on the menu.

Among the sushi specials, I chose the Greenbrier Roll. Tucked inside nori, or seaweed, and a sushi rice blanket is a healthy serving of spicy snapper and fried salmon. At the top of the roll are avocado and spicy crab.

It was a nice combination of tastes and textures. The snapper was tender and the salmon crispy. The two also had distinct seafood flavor profiles, which complemented each other strongly. The spicy crab was also complimentary, bringing its own seafood flavors and a bit of heat to the party. The rich and creamy avocado was literally the icing on the cake.

Of the vegetable sushi, I chose the sweet potato tempura roll. It was absolutely delicious, with sweet potato cuts lightly dredged and fried in tempura – a thin, very fragrant batter – until tender and crispy. It is then rolled up like a traditional sushi roll and served with a drizzle of dark soy sauce on top.

It’s very simple, but it’s very tasty. In my sushi adventures, I’ve never seen this roll offered before, but I’ll be on the lookout from now on.

We started the meal with a warming bowl of miso soup, perfect for the day we visited, which had a chill in the air. The broth was tasty with lots of miso umami, soybean paste and other ingredients which is a stirred soup. Pieces of diced tofu were found everywhere.

Hana Awaka Sparkling Flower is a delicious fruity sake - or rice wine.  The offer is very accessible, and served perfectly chilled and shows itself with a slight effervescence.  Patrick Evans-Hylton/independent

Served perfectly chilled and showing off a slight effervescence, Hana Awaka Sparkling Flower is a delicious fruity sake – or rice wine. The offering, from Ozeki, is very accessible and a good sake drink for people who might not like sake otherwise.

Sakura Japanese Restaurant is located at 1437 Sams Drive, Chesapeake. Call 757-410-4577 or visit www.SakuraChesapeake.com

Many restaurants close during major holidays like Thanksgiving or Christmas, but others open for people who may not have other plans.

Over the years, I’ve cooked great Thanksgiving dinners for my family and friends, and attended dinner parties at other homes. But sometimes, especially when the party is small or people are traveling some distance, it’s nice to have a holiday meal.

Here are a few Chesapeake and other regional restaurants open on Thanksgiving that have been my favorites at different times of the year. This is by no means a complete list of restaurants serving that day, just a few recommendations. If one of your favorites is not on the list, contact them to find out if they are open on the holiday or not.

Many restaurants offer special Thanksgiving menus in addition to or instead of their regular menu.

Be sure to book as early as possible so you don’t get disappointed, and most importantly, if you have to cancel, do so as soon as possible so the restaurant can offer your table to someone else.

Also keep in mind that there is one thing we should be thankful for, and that is our local restaurants and the staff who help us enjoy our meals out. Keep staff in mind when dining out during the holidays when deciding how to tip.

black pelican

Seafood

1625 Ring Road, Chesapeake

Call 757-424-3171 or visit www.BlackPelicanGreenbrier.com

The butcher’s son

Steak House

500 S. Battlefield Blvd., Chesapeake

Call 757-410-5466 or visit www.ButcherSon.com

Bistro by Todd Jurich

New American kitchen

150 W Main Street, Norfolk

Call 757-622-3210 or visit www.ToddJurichsBistro.com

Swan Terrace

american kitchen

Chesapeake Insider

Chesapeake Insider

Weekly

What’s happening around town, from news about the city council to your favorite restaurants

Inside Founders Inn and Spa, 5641 Indian River Road, Virginia Beach

Call 757-366-5777 or visit www.FoundersInn.com

Smithfield Station

american kitchen

415 S. Church Street, Smithfield

Call 757-357-7700 or visit www.SmtihfieldStation.com

Patrick Evans-Hylton PatrickEvansHylton@gmail.com

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Why Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya Won ‘Best Adults-Only All-Inclusive’ https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/why-secrets-akumal-riviera-maya-won-best-adults-only-all-inclusive/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 16:56:14 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/why-secrets-akumal-riviera-maya-won-best-adults-only-all-inclusive/ Share the article Last update 2 seconds ago The Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya won “Best Adults-Only All-Inclusive” at the 2022 Travvy Awards, and we’re not surprised. What makes this resort so special are its adults-only packages, perfect for couples looking for a romantic getaway. With secluded pools and a world-class spa, you’re sure to have […]]]>

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The Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya won “Best Adults-Only All-Inclusive” at the 2022 Travvy Awards, and we’re not surprised. What makes this resort so special are its adults-only packages, perfect for couples looking for a romantic getaway. With secluded pools and a world-class spa, you’re sure to have an unforgettable time!

Secrets Akumal Drone

This stunning resort is located in the heart of the Riviera Maya, a short drive from Cancun. Located on a secluded white sand beach and surrounded by lush jungle and crystal clear waters, it offers breathtaking views of the Caribbean Sea. Whether you are looking to relax or explore, this is the perfect location for the ultimate vacation.

So let’s take a look at what this resort has to offer!

Approvals

The Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya Secrets is dedicated to setting a new standard for all-inclusive resorts. With their Unlimited-Luxury policy, every amenity and service is included in your stay – from exquisite gourmet restaurants and first-class beverages to exciting day and night activities.

Image courtesy of: Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya

There are 434 hotel rooms in total, most of which have stunning ocean views, as well as whirlpool tubs, flat-screen cable TVs, and minibars. The scenic landscape goes well with the outdoor seating area located in each room. What makes it more interesting is the free Wi-Fi access throughout the establishment.

Secrets Akumal is also famous for its exceptional customer service. The property offers 24-hour front desk service and 24-hour room service to meet the needs of its guests.

World-class spa

This resort won an award for a reason: it offers guests an unparalleled experience. From peaceful surroundings to luxurious treatments, this spa is designed for your relaxation. Pamper yourself with body and facial treatments, hydrotherapy, massages and salon services, all using award-winning Pevonia products.

Don’t forget travel insurance for your next trip!

The Cancun Sun Recommends These 5 Quick And Easy Travel insurance plans to buy now

Packages starting at just $10 per week

massage tables spa room view at Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya
Image courtesy of: Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya

Secrets Spa by Pevonia is an iconic spa that offers a wide variety of treatments perfect for couples. The spa offers over 18,000 square feet of pure indulgence, along with other amenities, such as a refreshment bar, full-service salon, and sauna.

view of Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya's indoor spa
Image courtesy of: Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya

The spa specializes in singles and couples massages, making it a great place to relax and unwind with your partner. Their therapists are trained to offer different types of massages including stone massage, relaxation massage, and anti-tension massage.

Restaurants

view of the dining room at Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya
Image courtesy of: Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya

This is probably everyone’s favorite part! Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya has nine impressive restaurants, offering something to delight all taste buds. From regional cuisine favorites to seasonal dishes, you’ll be spoiled for choice when dining. And with six à la carte options, you can dine like a king or queen during your stay.

restaurant view at Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya
Image courtesy of: Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya

Each restaurant has a specialty to suit the tastes of each customer. The Barefoot Grill focuses on light lunch specials; Bordeaux specializes in French cuisine; Coco Cafe specializes in coffee and snacks; El Patio is best for Mexican food lovers; Market Cafe is an international buffet; Oceana is for seafood lovers; Portofino is a restaurant specializing in Italian dishes; Seaside Grill is a grill that serves food by the pool, and finally Himitsu, which specializes in Pan-Asian cuisine.

Plus, if you’re looking to unwind with a cocktail or drink by the pool, seven bars are on offer. These also include beach locations and private areas, so you can find the right spot for you and your mate.

Final Thoughts

Image courtesy of: Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya

Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya is committed to providing our guests with the best possible experience. With luxurious rooms, world-class restaurants and a wide range of amenities, you probably won’t want to leave. If you’re looking for an adults-only all-inclusive resort that offers a truly unique experience, this is the place for you.

Plan your next Cancun vacation:

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Choose from thousands of Hotels, resorts and hostels in Cancun and Riviera Maya with free cancellation on most properties


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Lucille chef Chris Williams signs first cookbook deal https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/lucille-chef-chris-williams-signs-first-cookbook-deal/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 17:48:20 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/lucille-chef-chris-williams-signs-first-cookbook-deal/ It’s been quite a year for the chef Chris Williams. This year, his restaurant Lucille’s celebrates its 10th anniversary – a significant milestone given the pandemic upheaval in Houston’s restaurant scene. And in March, he found himself in the culinary spotlight as an Outstanding Restaurateur finalist for the James Beard Awards, an accolade that brought […]]]>

It’s been quite a year for the chef Chris Williams. This year, his restaurant Lucille’s celebrates its 10th anniversary – a significant milestone given the pandemic upheaval in Houston’s restaurant scene. And in March, he found himself in the culinary spotlight as an Outstanding Restaurateur finalist for the James Beard Awards, an accolade that brought even more exposure to Williams and his acclaimed Museum District restaurant.

Now comes word that Williams has struck a deal to write her first cookbook, a project that will be co-written by a food and travel writer Kayla Stewart. recipe book, “Black Texas” will be published by Ten Speed ​​Press.

Although no release date has been announced – the authors have yet to start writing – the book deal is another feather in the hat for Williams who last year formed Lucille’s Hospitality Group, a partnership with chef Dawn Burrell as the umbrella organization for the group’s restaurant. and lifestyle projects that include the nonprofit Lucille’s 1913 Foundation.

Williams, who was traveling on Tuesday, could not be reached for comment. But Stewart, the author of the best-selling cookbook, “Gullah Geechee Home Cooking,” took instagram Tuesday to announce the project, which she says will tell the story of Texas cuisine through black history.

TURKEY TALK: Houston restaurants serve Thanksgiving Day dinner

At the heart of this story will be the legacy of William’s maternal great-grandmother, Lucille B. Smith, a Texas homemaker, educator, businesswoman and culinary innovator who published her own cookbook of her lifetime, “Lucille’s Treasure Chest of Fine Foods”. (This cookbook, which is no longer in print, recently marked its 80th anniversary of publication.) Williams’ restaurant at 5512 La Branche, which he opened in 2012, is named after Smith and his pioneering work. in the culinary arts continues to inspire its menu.

Stewart, who was born and raised in Houston and now splits her time between H-Town and New York, said she met Williams while writing a story about Lucille and Smith’s legacy, published in 2020 by the Southern Foodways Alliance. She and Williams share a “collaborative chemistry,” she said.

The cookbook project, which will take about two years, will include the history of Texas and the region of the contributions of black chefs and culinary entrepreneurs, as well as recipes inspired by Smith, Williams.

“We’ll talk about his life and his legacy, but we’ll also look at the eating habits of Black history and cuisine,” Stewart said.

On Tuesday night, Williams weighed in on Instagram: “I can’t wait to get this project done…Now let’s get to work!”

Greg Morago writes about food for the Houston Chronicle. Follow him on Facebook or Twitter. Send him topical tips at greg.morago@chron.com. Listen to him on our BBQ State of Mind podcast to learn more about barbecue culture in Houston and Texas.

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Finalists for Victoria’s New Restaurant of the Year Announced https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/finalists-for-victorias-new-restaurant-of-the-year-announced/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 21:52:57 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/finalists-for-victorias-new-restaurant-of-the-year-announced/ Two cross-currents shape Melbourne’s cuisine, both represented among the finalists for The Age Good Food Guide 2023 New Restaurant of the Year Award. One of the trends is the thirst for luxury as Australia experiences another Roaring Twenties, resulting in dens of pleasure such as South Yarra’s Yugen and CBD restaurants Warabi and Grill Americano. […]]]>

Two cross-currents shape Melbourne’s cuisine, both represented among the finalists for The Age Good Food Guide 2023 New Restaurant of the Year Award.

One of the trends is the thirst for luxury as Australia experiences another Roaring Twenties, resulting in dens of pleasure such as South Yarra’s Yugen and CBD restaurants Warabi and Grill Americano. But a different, quieter movement is also accelerating.

A handful of foreign-born chefs are opening restaurants where they combine their immigrant upbringing with a keen sense of Australian culinary culture, whether it’s the Filipino roots that underlie Serai in the CBD or Lao influences at Jeow in Richmond.

Yugen literally sparkles with gold, thanks to an intelligent lighting system Photo: Sam Davis



This weaving of undiluted flavors from a chef’s homeland with modern Melbourne sensibilities is an exciting development for Australian cuisine at the moment, says Besha Rodell, Good Food‘s chief restaurant critic, who describes the trend as a salvage kitchen.

“It’s about taking the flavors and techniques of traditional immigrant dishes and reclaiming the narrative, not to appeal to Western tastes or to impose an idea of ​​extreme authenticity, but to express the experiences of chefs whose identities are tied to more than one country or culture,” she says.

“They say, this is my food, this is my representation of it and it’s no less authentic than someone who cooks strictly authentic dishes in the Philippines, because that’s what has been my life.”

At Warabi, only 29 guests can bask in the rarefied atmosphere typical of Japanese gastronomy.

At Warabi, only 29 guests can bask in the rarefied atmosphere typical of Japanese gastronomy. Photo: Bonnie Savage



At Serai, chef Ross Magnaye picks influences from his upbringing in Davao City, in the southern Philippines, and his time working and dining in contemporary Melbourne restaurants. This results in dishes such as kangaroo kinilaw, a type of raw dish similar to ceviche.

Rodell is happy to see chefs such as Magnaye breaking the binary between “authentic cuisine” and “fusion cuisine”. “It’s a really false distinction, because it completely discounts the very authentic lived experience of people growing up with their feet in two cultures.”

At Richmond’s Jeow, chef-owner Thi Le honors Lao restaurants in suburban Sydney and Melbourne, where she’s eaten almost every week since she was a child.

The Vietnamese-Australian chef closed her Southeast Asian-owned restaurant Anchovy in June to make way for Jeow. This allowed him to devote himself to Lao flavors, alongside quality products from suppliers such as Great Ocean Ducks.

“I’m sure if I was cooking next to a Laotian aunt, she would say: Thi, what are you doing?” she jokes. “But I’m not saying it’s 100% authentic.”

Regional newcomer Chauncy’s menu is a passport to chef-owner Louis Naepels’ French upbringing, his Italian cooking prowess honed at Grossi Florentino, and his time in Spain’s Basque country. The trip prompted Naepels and his partner Tessa Murray to move from Melbourne to Heathcote to be closer to their vegetable suppliers.

The Grill Americano features premium cuts of beef on the menu, silver service, and a marble and leather dining room.

The Grill Americano features premium cuts of beef on the menu, silver service, and a marble and leather dining room. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui



Yugen, Warabi and Grill Americano, meanwhile, have tapped into a different vein now supporting catering in Melbourne.

Yugen, tucked away in the din of Chapel Street, literally sparkles with gold, thanks to a clever lighting system. There’s a star-studded cage for small groups overlooking the dining room, an upscale six-person sushi bar, and a menu studded with status symbols.

Culinary director Stephen Nairn thinks this escape is a magnet. “I think diners are now able to separate what is just a good, enjoyable meal and what was actually an experience.”

At Jeow, chef-owner Thi Le celebrates Laotian restaurants in the suburbs of Sydney and Melbourne.

At Jeow, chef-owner Thi Le celebrates Laotian restaurants in the suburbs of Sydney and Melbourne. Photo: Bonnie Savage



At Warabi, only 29 guests can bask in the rarefied atmosphere typical of Japanese gastronomy. The $245 menu showcases several techniques, with luxury at every turn, from wagyu to foie gras. Grill Americano also attracts pleasure-seekers, with several prime cuts of beef on the menu, backed by silver service and a dining room defined by marble and leather.

If there’s a unifying force between glam and next-gen fusion, it’s that Melburnians are in for a good night out.

New Restaurant of the Year Finalists

Chauncy

Regional newcomer Chauncy's menu is a passport to chef-owner Louis Naepels' French upbringing.

Regional newcomer Chauncy’s menu is a passport to chef-owner Louis Naepels’ French upbringing. Photo: Simon Schluter



178 High Street, Heathcote, chauncy.com.au

American grill

112 Flinders Lane, Melbourne, grillamericano.com

Jewish

338 Bridge Road, Richmond, jeow.net.au

will be

Racing Club Lane, Melbourne, serakitchen.com.au

Warabi

408 Flinders Lane, Melbourne, warabimelbourne.com

Yugen Restoration

605 Chapel Street, South Yarra, yugendining.com.au

The Good Food Guide 2023 The magazine is on sale from November 15 for $9.95 from newsagents and supermarkets or for pre-order at thestore.com.au.

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My 5 favorite restaurants to enjoy authentic Dutch cuisine in Holland https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/my-5-favorite-restaurants-to-enjoy-authentic-dutch-cuisine-in-holland/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 22:20:39 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/my-5-favorite-restaurants-to-enjoy-authentic-dutch-cuisine-in-holland/ I have been a resident of Holland, Michigan for over 17 years. I didn’t know much about the history of the Netherlands until I moved to this beloved city with Dutch roots. In the years that I have lived here, I have learned that the Dutch know how to eat! I made it a point […]]]>

I have been a resident of Holland, Michigan for over 17 years. I didn’t know much about the history of the Netherlands until I moved to this beloved city with Dutch roots. In the years that I have lived here, I have learned that the Dutch know how to eat! I made it a point to scour the city for the best restaurants that serve Dutch culinary delights, and here are the top five. So the next time you’re in town, whether it’s for the Tulip Time Festival or a summer visit to the beach on beautiful Lake Michigan, add these restaurants to your must-visit list!

The ceiling beams of the Hungry Dutchman Cafe showcase old world wisdom in Dutch.

Photo credit: Veronicajune Photography

1. Hungry Dutchman Cafe

The Hungry Dutchman Café is located in the Dutch village of Nelis, along 31 North in Holland. This cafe is small and unassuming but packs a mighty punch when it comes to Dutch food. The first thing you will notice upon entering are the ceiling beams decorated with well-known Dutch phrases that you would probably hear in the Netherlands. Look for “Na regen komt zonneschijn”, which roughly translates to “After the rain comes the sun” and “Wi zoekt vindt, wie waagt wint”, which means “He who seeks finds, he who dares wins”.

If you like the outdoors while you dine, take a look at the terrace, which overlooks a beautiful pond.

What to order

Whether you eat indoors or out, you’ll love the many Dutch dishes on the menu:

  • Banquethomemade almond paste
  • Erwtensoeptraditional Dutch pea soup
  • Frikandela Dutch-style hot dog, pan-fried and served with chopped onions, curry ketchup and mayonnaise
  • Croquettea fried beef croquette, served with large-grain Dutch mustard
  • metworstpork sausage from a traditional Dutch recipe, usually served with a warm potato salad
  • SaucijzenbroodjesPigs in a blanket

You can also order American food from the Hungry Dutchman, so if you’re not an adventurous eater or traveling with someone who prefers something non-Dutch, you can order burgers, hot dogs, sandwiches , salads and other items.

Thirsty Dutch pub in Holland, Michigan

Enjoy a wooden shoe flight of local beers on tap at the Thirsty Dutchman Pub

Photo credit: Veronicajune Photography

Pro tip: Plan to accompany your Dutch meal with a regional Dutch draft beer at the nearby Thirsty Dutchman Pub. You can choose from local beers, and if you can’t narrow it down, treat yourself to a flight served in a klompen (wooden shoe).

2. Dutch Brothers Restaurant

The Dutch Brothers Restaurant is owned and operated by three brothers, the first generation sons born to Dutch immigrants. These boys grew up eating classic Dutch dishes such as pea soup and croquette (fried beef croquettes). They now share these delicious dishes with the community at the Dutch Brothers restaurant.

Pigs in a blanket with Dutch mustard and a bowl of pea soup

Pigs in a blanket with Dutch mustard and a bowl of pea soup

Photo credit: Veronicajune Photography

What to order

Be sure to look for the ‘Dutch stuff’ section of the menu, which includes ham and pea soup, saucijzenbroodjes (pigs in a blanket), almond coffee cake and even a sampler plate to treat yourself to. experience. With a “Taste of the Old Country” you can taste all the Dutch delicacies, including a piece of soft Gouda cheese.

Pro tip: Once seated in the dining room, look for the black and white family photos on the wall showing the three brothers dressed in Dutch costumes as children.

The DeBoer Bakery krakelingen

DeBoer bakery makes the best krakelingen.

Photo credit: Veronicajune Photography

3. DeBoer Bakkerij

The deBoer Bakkerij (meaning “bakery” in English) is connected to the Dutch Brothers restaurant and is delightfully decorated in Dutch decor, including a bakfiet (Dutch bike), a variety of baked goods and a small cooler with Dutch cheeses for purchase.

What to order

If you haven’t had a krakelingen, it’s time to try one! Once you’ve tasted it, you’ll want to stock up on these sweet and crunchy little treats! Shaped like pretzels, these cookies are made from puff pastry and sprinkled with sugar. The magic is in how the sugar glaze dries to a crispy finish. Yum! You won’t be able to stop at just one!

Other delicious offerings from deBoer’s bakery include handmade Dutch banket (sweet dough rolled into a long, narrow log shape filled with a mixture of sweet almond paste), currant and almonds and Dutch rusks.

Pro tip: DeBoer offers a fantastic Maple Bacon Donut, filled with a delicious cream filling and topped with a slice of bacon. It’s the perfect sweet and savory treat!

The original sign remains in front of the Wooden Shoe Restaurant

The original sign remains in front of the Wooden Shoe Restaurant

Photo credit: Veronicajune Photography

4. Wooden shoe restaurant

The Wooden Shoe restaurant is steeped in the history of the Dutch community. The building was built in 1958 and was used as a tourist favourite, the Wooden Shoe Factory, where visitors came to see authentic Dutch carvers creating real wooden shoes like those worn in the Netherlands. However, in the 1990s the owners changed their business focus and the building was sold and became the Wooden Shoe Restaurant, Tap House and Wooden Shoe Antique Mall, all as a tribute to the original purpose of the structure. The entrance to the Wooden Shoe restaurant is accessible without stairs and provides easy access throughout the building.

When you stop at the Wooden Shoe, you may have to wait as it is a popular breakfast and lunch destination in Holland. Don’t worry, you can walk around the connected antiques mall and enjoy looking at and even buying all kinds of beautiful relics from the past.

What to order

Once seated, go on an adventure and treat yourself to a few slices of Balkenbrij. This traditional Dutch cuisine is similar to what we call scrapple in the United States. The Baulkenbrij is prepared in-house from a special recipe including a burger, pork butt roast and liver, then seasoned with alum and allspice. The meat is then mixed with buckwheat flour to bind it. This dish is a local favorite and a conversation piece!

The people of Holland, Michigan are very friendly, and when I stopped to sample my first Balkenbrij, a few people dining at nearby tables were eager to join in and share their knowledge of this unusual dish. One of them even regaled me with the entire manufacturing process from the original cuts of meat through boiling, grinding, mixing, cooking, cooling, slicing and frying.

She has fond memories of it with her grandmother, no doubt an immigrant straight from the Netherlands. A gentleman at another nearby table remarked, “The Dutch know how to use every bit of the animal and not let anything go to waste.” Baulkenbrij is the perfect example.

Baulkenbrij served on buttered white bread with syrup drizzled over it

Baulkenbrij is often served on buttered white bread with syrup drizzled over it.

Photo credit: Veronicajune Photography

Pro tip: If you prefer Baulkenbrij, enjoy it on a slice of white bread buttered and drizzled with syrup, as recommended by our new table companions. Some people prefer a touch of salt and pepper to the syrup, but the sweet topping was welcome on the odd meat. If Baulkenbrij isn’t your cup of tea, you can pick up another Dutch favorite here at The Wooden Shoe, the pig in a blanket. The pigs are also made from scratch and you will see them served at the tables around you. Finally, for a sweet treat, don’t miss a giant (and I mean giant) cinnamon roll while you’re here!

5. Russian Restaurant

Russ’ Restaurant was founded in 1934 and continues to serve the local community over 85 years later. Everything you will find in this restaurant is homemade with an extra dose of Dutch love! Of course, Russ’ also serves many Dutch classics like split pea soup and pigs in a blanket.

After your main course, have a slice of pie or a famous Dutch apple dumpling served with vanilla ice cream. Russ’ Restaurant is locally known for its pies made from scratch, and you can even take an entire pie home!

Plan for essential dishes and home service when you go to Russ’ Restaurant. Parking is always sufficient, the food is always good and all their locations are easily accessible without stairs!

What to order

My favorite is the thin gem sandwich, a classic Dutch dish. My husband notes that his family still serves this type of sandwich at family gatherings and funeral lunches. He calls it “ham on a bun”. Consisting of thin slices of ham and Swiss cheese placed on a buttered white bun, you can add condiments as you wish, but the thin jewel sandwich at Russ’ comes with lettuce, tomato and mayo, then served with fries.

Pro tip: I recommend a half order of Russ’ hand beaten onion rings instead of fries. They may not be real Dutch food, but they are delicious and regular customers love them!

dutch bank

Dutch banket is a local favorite, but it’s sweet. Don’t rush him!

Photo credit: Veronicajune Photography

More Dutch Restaurants

After spending a day or a weekend in Charming Holland, Michigan, you might want a taste of Holland, Michigan at home after your visit. No problem! Several stores in Holland offer Dutch treats that you can take with you. Check out the Dutch Village Downtown store on 8th Street to sample delicious Dutch cheeses such as Gouda and Edam, both mild in taste and color, but oh so delicious! You can also find a variety of other great Dutch snacks like stroopwafels (wafer cookies sandwiched around a thin layer of caramel), speculoos (windmill cookies), and beschuit (round toast baked twice).

Stroll through the shops in the gardens of Windmill Island and take home a bag of Windmill Flour, whole-wheat flour made from wheat grown in western Michigan and ground in the Windmill on site, the last authentic Dutch windmill exported from the Netherlands.

You can also choose a bag of Dutch licorice, available at Veldheer Tulip Gardens at the northern end of town. The Dutch love their licorice. You can choose from salty, sweet, hard, soft and all different colors and shapes flavors and textures.

No matter where you choose to eat in Holland, Michigan, you won’t leave hungry!

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The subtle & diverse flavors of Karnataka https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/the-subtle-diverse-flavors-of-karnataka/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 19:15:34 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/the-subtle-diverse-flavors-of-karnataka/ The culinary map of Karnataka is very interesting and exciting, thanks to its vast geographical area and the diversity of its gastronomic styles. Having lived in Karnataka for almost two decades and traveled across the state to know the cuisine in depth and study the original regional cuisine in these varied social and cultural customs […]]]>

The culinary map of Karnataka is very interesting and exciting, thanks to its vast geographical area and the diversity of its gastronomic styles. Having lived in Karnataka for almost two decades and traveled across the state to know the cuisine in depth and study the original regional cuisine in these varied social and cultural customs that are inseparable in parts of the regions, one could almost map the geography and cultural diversity across these cuisines – dishes that are spicy and tart, bland, as much as spongy or crispy.

Some dishes that started in royal kitchens have become signature dishes. The royal kitchens of Mysore had a culinary repertoire of wholesome delicacies like Kosambari, Puliyogare, Palyas, Gojju, Huli, Obbattu and many others but also the famous Mysore Pack which was accidentally invented by its royal chef Kakasura Madappa when he cooked gram flour, ghee and sugar together. Also, the ubiquitous Bisi Bele Bath, another popular palate delight, which, again, is said to have been made here first. As it emerged from royal kitchens and became popular, it evolved to include vegetables and became a meal that farmers typically ate after working in the fields. The other two gastronomic kings who established the descriptions of food, cooking techniques and eating etiquettes, vegetarian flavors and meat are described by King Someshwara of Kalyana in Bidar in Manasollasa and also King Basavaraja of Keladi in West Karnataka who started eating from banana leaf in an organized way. Mangaluru is a melting pot of cultures with its diverse communities like the Tuluvas, Saraswat Brahmins, Gaud Brahmins, Catholics and Bunts, which bring an eclectic mix to the culinary spectrum. The repertoire is striking in all its flavor profiles – sweet, sour, salty, pungent, bitter and astringent which combine in countless ways to create the incredible diversity of this cuisine. Fish curry with raw kokum, tamarind or mango flavor, fermented pillow sannas, neer dosas, Kori Gassi – very slim kori rotispongy Goli Baje and Patrodewould lose its flavor if not steamed and stuffed in colocasia leaves. Kane or quick-fried ladyfish, a variation of hoppers called kappa roti which is served with mackerel curry – locally known as Bangude Ghassi. And a few kilometers away is Kundapur which is best known for its ghee-roasted chicken, mutton with shrimp and also Kundapur Koli which is India’s best served chilli chicken in my opinion.

Let’s go a few miles further to Udupi and find joy in an entirely different cuisine better known as Madhava cuisine which was based on the Vaishnav principles of Krishna Mutt – to be managed and served by Shivalli Brahmins. These masters of gastronomy or Pakashastra, the Shivalli Brahmins of Old Udupi created a clever blend of prasadam which became very popular, so quickly that it was commercially transformed into vegetarian cuisine. I think that’s what gave Udupi cuisine a significant edge. As for Coorg’s kitchen, Pandhi Highland Kodvas curry and bamboo shoot curry come to mind. The Kodavas prefer a cuisine around hunting and agriculture served with steamed rice puttus and expert use of Kachampuli, the concentrated vinegar of the kokum fruit. Some of my favorite native specialties are the absolutely buttery and delicious pasta masala dosa dumpster in Davanagere, melting milk Peda from Dharwad, Vijayapura Jolada Rotti Ootathe milky dessert that makes your lips smack Kunda of Belagavi, the famous Mandige Bellary sweets, the must-have Mirchi Bonda of Chitradurga, and Maddur Vada from Maddur which is a highly sought after donut. The list is exhaustive but that is what makes Karnataka unique.

(The author is an award-winning chef, mentor, maven, and food and beverage master with over three decades of experience in leading world-class hotels and restaurants around the world.)

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Karon Liu on Dumpling Magic ‹ Literary Center https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/karon-liu-on-dumpling-magic-literary-center/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 09:01:02 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/karon-liu-on-dumpling-magic-literary-center/ I’ve been a Toronto-based food writer for over a decade, and there’s one project I always wanted to do but never did (until now). I wanted to map this city of nearly six million inhabitants through pellets. My map would show the different enclaves and communities based on the location of all pierogi spots versus […]]]>

I’ve been a Toronto-based food writer for over a decade, and there’s one project I always wanted to do but never did (until now). I wanted to map this city of nearly six million inhabitants through pellets. My map would show the different enclaves and communities based on the location of all pierogi spots versus the locations of wonton soup restaurants or all manti spots.

Toronto is the perfect city to create such a map: a metropolis that has evolved into one of the most diverse culinary destinations in the world, thanks to waves of migration that have brought together cuisines from disparate regions of the world. This place is a mix of cooks practicing age-old techniques learned from previous generations, innovators sharing new creations in the age of TikTok, and cooks embracing their third-culture cuisine – combining what they learned from their parents with the new flavors and methods that come from living in a city where a roti restaurant, a sushi restaurant and a souvlaki joint can all be found in one place.

A perfect example of this phenomenon is Tibet Kitchen in Little Tibet, a strip of Tibetan-owned restaurants and shops in the Parkdale neighborhood of Toronto. Chaat momos are one of my favorite local dishes: these Tibetan (or vegetarian, depending on my mood) meatballs are smothered in a vibrant orange tamarind sauce, then sprinkled with chopped tomatoes, cilantro, yogurt and sevum. crisp, combining Tibetan and Indian. the flavours; it’s an example of successful fusion – the flavors and textures work so well in every bite.

The more I write about food, the more I realize that such an endeavor requires a team of people. Yes, dumplings are universal – that’s why they’re such an easy gateway into a culture’s cuisine. At the same time, there are many variations of dumplings: steamed, fried or boiled; filled or not; sweet or salty; big or small; in soups or alone. There are nuances in cuisines that vary between regions, cities and, heck, households and generations that no one can ever fully grasp.

Dumplings are universal, which is why they’re such an easy gateway into a culture’s cuisine.

Technically, matzo balls in Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine, xiaolongbao or soup dumplings in Shanghainese cuisine, and Jamaican spinners used in soups and stews are all classified as dumplings. But these dishes don’t have much else in common, other than how delicious they are. I remember being introduced to spätzle as a teenager, when I was invited to a friend’s house to try Austrian home cooking. I gobbled down the spätzle with the schnitzel, puzzled but amazed that the dumplings existed beyond the wontons I ate growing up.

Heck, even with wontons, everyone in my friends and family circles prefers a different filling or fold. A friend prefers the squeezing method – literally putting a little filling in the wrapper and then squeezing his hand into a fist to seal it – because it’s the quickest method (and the most common for sifus in restaurants ). My mom, on the other hand, prefers the fold that makes the dumpling look like someone wearing a beanie because that’s what her mom taught her. Don’t even get me started on the differences between a wonton, water dumpling, potsticker and soup dumpling… mainly because I’m still learning the different techniques and regional variations of each of them as I dive more and more deeply into Chinese cuisine.

*

What I can do is toss out my hypothetical card with a story about what dumplings mean to me.

Ever since I can remember, when my mom was out of dinner ideas and in a rush, wontons were one of her favorites: ground pork, nappa cabbage, a mix of dark soy sauces and clear with a little cane sugar and a pack of store-bought dumpling wrappers. I watched her pinch a walnut-sized piece of filling from a large metal bowl and place it in the center of the wrapper. She dipped a finger into a bowl of rice filled with water, brushed the edge of the wrapper, and through a series of pinches and creases, a dumpling appeared in seconds.

Now a confession: despite all the times I watched my mom make wontons and promised myself that eventually I would learn the skill so that I could a) have another quick weeknight dinner in my arsenal; and b) gaining some credibility on the street as a guy who writes a lot about Chinese food, I haven’t been able to make dumplings on my own yet.

Doesn’t not being able to fold a perfectly neat, symmetrical wonton make me less of an authority on food writing?

So I consider myself to be in a culinary gray area. I am an experienced food writer whose palate revolves around Cantonese cuisine. And yet, I can’t bend a dumpling to save my life. Doesn’t not being able to fold a perfectly neat, symmetrical wonton make me less of an authority on food writing?

I remember once attending a dumpling folding party – that’s what happens when you have foodie friends. After a few minutes I was gently, uh, encouraged to do something else because I was basically wasting really good wraps with every failed attempt. Oddly enough, my Hungarian partner, who had never touched a dumpling wrapper before, was able to squeeze them out without much effort. Since then, he occasionally makes a few dozen batches to freeze for future meals. Oddly, the way he folds his dumplings is similar to my mother’s technique. I have no idea if this was a secret joint effort between them to push me to try to learn again.

*

In the early months of COVID-19, in January 2020, I went with friends to a noodle restaurant in Markham called Wuhan Noodle 1950 to order its dry pot noodles and a side of dumplings. Months before the official declaration of the pandemic emergency in Canada, Chinese restaurants had begun to see their business collapse due to old racist stereotypes about Chinese food and cleanliness, all of which had resurfaced amid a quivering fear about the virus.

This particular place had been inundated with racist hoaxes that were perpetuated on social media. Feeling the restaurant could use a positive boost, I went there, had a great meal and wrote about it for the Toronto Star. I explained the restaurant’s regional Chinese cuisine and how a place like this fits into the evolution of Chinese cuisine in the GTA.

In recent years we have seen a greater proliferation of regional Chinese cuisine from independent owners and international chains using the GTA as a test market before expanding elsewhere. Chinese cuisine here evolved from Canadian-Chinese chop suey houses to more Hong Kong and Cantonese cuisine as the GTA saw an influx of immigrants in the 80s and 90s. Then other mainland Chinese people came , bringing their regional cuisine, as well as international Chinese chains serving everything from hot pot to different styles of noodles.

Chinese food is no longer lumped into one giant category, and diners are increasingly aware that hand-pulled beef noodles are representative of Lanhzou, and to get a xiaolongbao steamer basket, you need to go to a Shanghainese place. Although the circumstances in which I discovered this place serving dry noodles from Wuhan were unfortunate, it gave me the opportunity to talk about the dish originating from Hubei province.

Dumplings came into my life again during the first months of the pandemic lockdown in Toronto. Bags of frozen potstickers became a bit of a savior in my house in the pre-pandemic vaccine era, when every trip to the supermarket felt like running for supplies during a zombie apocalypse.

Everyone has a different relationship when it comes to food, including something as mundane and traditional as the dumpling.

We bought frozen potstickers in bags of a hundred from a wholesale store called Northern Dumpling Co. in our Scarborough neighborhood. For the many days in those first few months when I could barely get out of bed, let alone cook a meal from scratch, the dumplings fueled me to carry on another day.

*

Similarly, in the spring of 2022, church basements and restaurants across Canada produced varenyky by the thousands to raise relief funds for Ukrainian refugees. Diners wanting to show their support ordered the dumplings by the dozens and became more interested in learning more about Ukraine’s response to pierogi.

What I’m trying to say is that everyone has a different relationship when it comes to food, including something as mundane and traditional as the dumpling. As people move on, generational attitudes and values ​​change, ingredients and techniques adapt or evolve, and as technology changes the way we cook, the role food plays in our lives changes. also.

It is impossible for a dish to remain static, like a centerpiece in a museum, if the people who cook and eat it are not static. Therefore, there will never be a definitive guide to meatballs, whether in map or anthology form, because our relationship to food keeps changing. Instead, think of this volume as a snapshot of how our relationship with dumplings is holding up right now, as told by people right now.

Who knows? Maybe five years from now, if you ask me what my relationship is with dumplings, I can say it’s one of my quick weeknight meals. I might add masala spices because an Indian restaurant owner gave me a few jars of his dad’s mixes and bragged that they could be used in anything. Or I’ll add finely chopped mint to the garnish as a nod to Vietnamese restaurants I always turn to for takeout – and as a way to use local ingredients – because I have a serious problem with overgrown mint in my yard.

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Extract of What are we talking about when we talk about dumplings, edited by John Lorinc. Copyright © 2022. Available from Coach House Books.

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What is the difference between Tex-Mex food and Mexican food? https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/what-is-the-difference-between-tex-mex-food-and-mexican-food/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 18:30:00 +0000 https://sushirestaurantalbany.com/what-is-the-difference-between-tex-mex-food-and-mexican-food/ The main difference between Tex-Mex cuisine and authentic Mexican cuisine is the ingredients used for each. Cumin is an example. The use of cumin in Tex-Mex cuisine dates back to the 1890s in San Antonio when a German immigrant started selling chili powder that included the Indian herb, as History explains. Thrillist also mentions some […]]]>

The main difference between Tex-Mex cuisine and authentic Mexican cuisine is the ingredients used for each. Cumin is an example. The use of cumin in Tex-Mex cuisine dates back to the 1890s in San Antonio when a German immigrant started selling chili powder that included the Indian herb, as History explains.

Thrillist also mentions some ingredients you’ll find in Tex-Mex that you won’t find in traditional Mexican cuisine, including beef, black beans, yellow cheese, canned vegetables, and wheat flour. The site also lists some popular Tex-Mex dishes, including the aforementioned nachos and fajitas, as well as chili con carne and enchiladas.

Shedding light on the other end of the spectrum, Saul Montiel, the executive chef of Cantina Rooftop in New York City, lists some of the ingredients and dishes that are commonly prepared in authentic Mexican cuisine (via Facebook/NowThis Food). These include tostadas, flautas, tamales, dried chili, corn tortillas, herbs, papalo, romero, and cabeza tacos.

The next question to ask is, why did Tex-Mex cuisine begin to use different ingredients from cuisine south of the border?

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